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Disability Rating (sc)...do You Have To Disclose To Employer?


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#1 MDB1968NM

 
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Posted 14 September 2009 - 08:50 PM

Hi everyone,

If this is not the right area then Mods please move this.

If someone is applying for a job after military retirement and they are disabled (SC), does that have to be disclosed to the employer?  The reason I ask is that many govt jobs ask if you are applying for preference.  Would the employer need to know what your disabilities are, OR, would they just have to know your rating percentage if that?

I would think that some employers might hold having a disability against the potential job seeker in certain instances.  Has anyone had any direct experience with this?

Thanks for the information in advance!

;)

#2 rdnkjeeper

 
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Posted 14 September 2009 - 08:54 PM

I did not retire, but when I have applied for jobs I have always disclosed that I have a bad back and that I am a Disabled Veteran. I usually tell them that when I am at the interview. I also say that as the employer they can get a tax break for hiring a Disabled Vet......

#3 MDB1968NM

 
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Posted 14 September 2009 - 08:56 PM

Thanks....I would make the assumption that it is one of the things that employers are not supposed to ask...like marital status, dependents, religion, etc. but was curious.

#4 jim n ok

 
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Posted 14 September 2009 - 09:01 PM

the employer only needs to know if your disability prevents you from doing the job you are hired for. i am 70 percent and my employer doesn't care unless my ptsd prevents me from doing my job. some sc 's are protected by the americans with disabilities act and does not have to be disclosed, check the ada rules.

#5 jbasser

 
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Posted 14 September 2009 - 09:02 PM

Well said jim.

J

#6 MDB1968NM

 
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Posted 14 September 2009 - 09:04 PM

Thanks Jim!  That makes 100% sense to me and I will look into the ADA information!  I know that some people consider having a "disability" like a scarlet letter and that is a shame.

#7 jim n ok

 
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Posted 14 September 2009 - 09:09 PM

diabetes and mental disabilities to name a few.

http://www.ada.gov/

Edited by jim n ok, 14 September 2009 - 09:15 PM.


#8 Ricky

 
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Posted 14 September 2009 - 09:47 PM

If you are speaking of the preference awarded to disabled vets by the federal govt all they want to know if the percentage. If it is a private employer and they send you to a physical I would be truthful with the doc.

#9 pete992

 
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Posted 14 September 2009 - 10:00 PM

MDB1968NMPosted Today, 09:50 PM Hi everyone,

Hi everyone,

If this is not the right area then Mods please move this.

If someone is applying for a job after military retirement and they are disabled (SC), does that have to be disclosed to the employer? The reason I ask is that many govt jobs ask if you are applying for preference. Would the employer need to know what your disabilities are, OR, would they just have to know your rating percentage if that?

I would think that some employers might hold having a disability against the potential job seeker in certain instances. Has anyone had any direct experience with this?

Thanks for the information in advance!


It depends on the type of job you are applying for. Some government agencies and private companies need to know if you need some type of special accommodations to help you with the job. Examples: special chair, keyboard, small quiet room or something. You can always try to research the agency or company to find out if they have a policy for disabled persons. Also on any federal form make sure you tell the truth and try to be honest as possible.

Edited by pete992, 14 September 2009 - 10:02 PM.


#10 Papa

 
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Posted 14 September 2009 - 10:07 PM

Is it your goal to do the same thing as a civil service employee as you did in the military? We have military personnel retire all the time and jump right into the civilian job. Where else can we find such experience. Does your SC disability keep you from doing your job while in the military? If not, it should not matter in civilian life. It should not matter unless it puts your safety or others at risk. It should not matter unless a person does not qualify for the position regardless medical condition. In fact, you can request accompandations that will make your jon easier, if it doles not conflict with the employers goals.

We had a man in our office (non-veteran) that has a bad back. For years his bosses had allowed him to lay on his back on a conference table. Well, we got this new guy in and he made the guy stop and if he wanted to lay on his back, he would need to take leave and go to his car. EEO complaint filed, the new boss looked like a fool and they had to maske him a cubicle with a door, and space for him to lay down.

Bottom line do not let this stop you. No government agency in their right mind would hold this against you.

Papa

#11 rentalguy1

 
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Posted 14 September 2009 - 11:19 PM

You do not have to disclose your exact percentage in seeking preference. The VA will issue a veterans preference letter at the vet's request that only states that you are a sc'd veteran with 30% or greater sc'd disability.

#12 MDB1968NM

 
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Posted 15 September 2009 - 06:07 AM

Thanks Everyone...

That all makes sense!  Appreciate the responses!!!

#13 Hoppy

 
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Posted 16 September 2009 - 11:25 PM

I developed three significant disabilities by the time I was 28 years old. I went to job interviews and discussed my disabilities with the interviewer. I had a college degree and applied for jobs where I was initially screened by interviewers in the personnel department. I went for over a year without being hired for any job. As such, the state of California paid me while I attended special job-search classes for persons with disabilities. I think that even though there are incentives to hire disabled veterans that some employers would rather not deal with any employee with a chronic back problem.

While attending the state-funded job-search classes we were taught to take special care to apply for jobs that would not aggravate a pre-existing disability. We are taught to read job descriptions and discussed job duties during interviews prior to making any statement as to what our disabilities were. We were told that employers only have the right to know about disabilities that will be aggravated by a job or that will prevent you from doing a specific job.

Believe it or not we were taught to hide all disabilities that might be visible to an interviewer in a personnel department. We were taught that these interviewers were trained to identify disabilities without asking questions. We were taught that these interviewers did not higher persons with neck and back injuries even if the doctors didn't think the job would aggravate the pre-existing condition. These employers did not want to hire an employee who might miss work or even later claim the back condition was related to their new job.

We were taught to turn our head before we turned our shoulders so as not to appear to have stiffness in the neck. We were taught to sit and stand normally. We were taught to move freely.

My neck problems have finally gotten to the point where it is difficult for me to type on my computer. I wrote this entire response using a voice to text program. It works pretty good. I just sit back in my chair and talk. I wish I would've found this program about 10 years ago. If I did not find this program I probably would have dropped off of hadit.

Edited by Hoppy, 16 September 2009 - 11:27 PM.


#14 john999

 
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Posted 17 September 2009 - 07:39 AM

Try to get a job with USPS if you have a bad back. They are going to want to know about you SC disability. They asked me if I could work 12 hours a day on my feet. How many with a bad back could do that? Also you have to be able to lift 70 pounds. If you are rated 30% for a back problem they want to know the details before they hire you. They do deny employment to people based on their disabilies, but not on their ratings. Disability discrimination is rampant in and out of government. Government may hire disabled but then they start process of firing them.

#15 LarryJ

 
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Posted 17 September 2009 - 01:23 PM

MDB1968NMPosted Today, 09:50 PM Hi everyone,


It depends on the type of job you are applying for. Some government agencies and private companies need to know if you need some type of special accommodations to help you with the job. Examples: special chair, keyboard, small quiet room or something. You can always try to research the agency or company to find out if they have a policy for disabled persons. Also on any federal form make sure you tell the truth and try to be honest as possible.



Yer kiddin' me! Small, quite room!
HEY? Where's this job been all my life?
Heck, I'm "ready to re-join the workforce"......................................NOT!

#16 LarryJ

 
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Posted 17 September 2009 - 01:26 PM

I developed three significant disabilities by the time I was 28 years old. I went to job interviews and discussed my disabilities with the interviewer. I had a college degree and applied for jobs where I was initially screened by interviewers in the personnel department. I went for over a year without being hired for any job. As such, the state of California paid me while I attended special job-search classes for persons with disabilities. I think that even though there are incentives to hire disabled veterans that some employers would rather not deal with any employee with a chronic back problem.

While attending the state-funded job-search classes we were taught to take special care to apply for jobs that would not aggravate a pre-existing disability. We are taught to read job descriptions and discussed job duties during interviews prior to making any statement as to what our disabilities were. We were told that employers only have the right to know about disabilities that will be aggravated by a job or that will prevent you from doing a specific job.

Believe it or not we were taught to hide all disabilities that might be visible to an interviewer in a personnel department. We were taught that these interviewers were trained to identify disabilities without asking questions. We were taught that these interviewers did not higher persons with neck and back injuries even if the doctors didn't think the job would aggravate the pre-existing condition. These employers did not want to hire an employee who might miss work or even later claim the back condition was related to their new job.

We were taught to turn our head before we turned our shoulders so as not to appear to have stiffness in the neck. We were taught to sit and stand normally. We were taught to move freely.

My neck problems have finally gotten to the point where it is difficult for me to type on my computer. I wrote this entire response using a voice to text program. It works pretty good. I just sit back in my chair and talk. I wish I would've found this program about 10 years ago. If I did not find this program I probably would have dropped off of hadit.



Hey, Hoppy, what's the name of the VTT program? It certainly seems to be working well.

#17 Stretch

 
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Posted 17 September 2009 - 04:21 PM

I agree with Hoppy 100%.

I applied for a job as a machinist around 1985 in Torrance Calif. I aced the written test. When I went to the physical exam, the doctor picked up on my back injury immediately just by the way that I was standing. I didn't tell them one word about my back. The doctor sent me to X-ray. I was denied employment with the doctor and HR saying that I couldn't lift over 15 lbs and that I had an old back injury.

I was so upset that I couldn't see straight. It really shocked me that their company examiner could pick-up on this injury so quickly and easily without knowing anything about me. I never worried about Vets preference, because I was very good at my job experience. I just couldn't believe being turned down.

One of my compaints with the VA, after leaving service, was the back injury and constant pain. I thought I had learned to mask the condition pretty well. The VA said that my back was fine, denying my back claims in the 1970's. I wasn't looking for compensation. I went to the VA for help.

It is funny that a real doctor can see injuries, right now. The Vet is left between a rock and a hard place..

I am usually the last one to know these sort of things that can cause a Veteran rejection from work.


#18 Papa

 
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Posted 17 September 2009 - 04:54 PM

[quote name='MDB1968NM' date='Sep 14 2009, 09:50 PM' post='166109']
Hi everyone,

If this is not the right area then Mods please move this.

If someone is applying for a job after military retirement and they are disabled (SC), does that have to be disclosed to the employer? The reason I ask is that many govt jobs ask if you are applying for preference. Would the employer need to know what your disabilities are, OR, would they just have to know your rating percentage if that?

I would think that some employers might hold having a disability against the potential job seeker in certain instances. Has anyone had any direct experience with this?

Thanks for the information in advance!

B)


Years ago, I applied for a trainee position for the Government. The first thing the interviewer ask me was I a Vietnam Veteran. Told her yes. Are you a disabled Veteran? Yes. Well, we do not need your kind around here <_< . I left in a hurry, as I'm Italian and a Hillbilly and I do have a temper. So what did I do? I went to the Texas Rehab Commission and they actually got me a job in accounting at Ft. Sam Houston under the handicap program, not the disabled verterans program. I got hired in as a GS-4 with a BBA, but I had my foot in the door. There are other ways to beat that dead horse :)

Papa

#19 MDB1968NM

 
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Posted 17 September 2009 - 06:17 PM

Thanks folks!  VERY insightful information....I suppose you are at the luck of the draw with the employer.




Hoppy your VTT program is amazing!  I am glad that you found that!

#20 broncovet

 
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Posted 17 September 2009 - 07:53 PM

To Disclose or Not to Disclose is a subject often brought up by many disabled groups. Some disabilities are quite visible, such as an amputee, while other disabilities are what we call invisible.

Visible Disabilities: Not really much point..you might as well disclose and you may even find a potential sympathetic employer who actually does give 10 points preference to disabled Vets.

Invisible Disabilities: In short, you decide. Weigh the plusses and minuses of disclosing your disability to a potential employer:

Plus: As above, you may find the rare employer who actually follows ADA/Veterans Preference/ Disabled Veteran Preference
If you are hired, and you need time off to go to doc, you are more likely to get it if you disclose.
You can ask for a "reasonable accomodation" to your disability, but it will be hard to do this if you do not disclose.


Minus: FAct: Disabled individuals unemployment rates are 3 to 10 times higher than non disabled. This means they wont hire you in spite of the laws.
If you bring up your disability, your employer will want to talk about it in detail, and you wont get a chance to discuss your abilities.
If you do get hired, other employees will often use it against you. "The only reason he got promoted was because of his wheelchair".
The employer will often worry about your accomodations and not hire you because he is not sure he can accomodate your disabilities.
You may have to answer questions you may not want to answer that are brought up when you disclose.
If your disability is mental, such as depression or PTSD, the employer may not hire you because he fears for other employees or customers safety if you "go off" such as the disgruntled Chuck E Cheese employee who shot several other employees.
You will often be offered a lower salary, if offered a job at all because people often perceive others with disabilities as not being capable of anything more than menial tasks such as packing light bulbs in boxes.
Often you will be underestimated because of your disability and you will have to work much harder to make up for it.
Your employer/coworker may want to "diagnose" you. That is, "YOu dont look depressed to me..have you tried St. John's Wort?" or "Look on the positive side..things will get better"
Others may fear you..especially with mental health issues. It will be especially hard to communicate in this environment, and your job, if you get it, will be exceedingly difficult.
Some may be jealous if they perceive that you are being compensated for your disability, even if rated at zero percent.

#21 iraqx2

 
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Posted 18 September 2009 - 06:28 AM

As a recent aggressive job seeker and have gone to several interviews, it depends on the job you are applying to disclose your SC Disability. If it is a government job, yes, because preference is involved. And with preference, you are protected under the laws and policies governed by OPM ( though I think the Fed Hiring system is a fraud , LOL ). If you can ever proved that preference was not used ( yes, good luck with proving an agency was wrong ), you can actually sue them.

If it is a private employer, I may think twice. Unless your disabilities are obvious and blatant, of course disclose your disability. If it effects your job and the safety of others, disclose as well. I just believe that if people don't need to know, they should not. It has been my own experience. The scary reality we are living in right now is that employers are looking for " drama " free employees, especially in this tight job market. And unfortunately, some don't even care if you are a Veteran, let alone a disabled one. It can be a double edge sword.

Regardless, good luck.

#22 Hoppy

 
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Posted 19 September 2009 - 10:47 PM

Larry,

The name of the program is Dragon. I bought it at Fry's electronics. It had trouble with your name. However, it picked up on Fry's electronics with no problem. The more I use the program the better it works. I originally had to train the program by reading pre-existing documents provided by the software. It updates every time you close the program based on your most recent writings. You can also tell the program to read files typed and are stored on your computer. Thus, it learns your writing style and the types of words and phrases you have used in the past. It works best in word. When I try to type correctly into the boxes on a hadits website it does get confused. So I just type everything in word and copy and paste onto the Internet.

It has a lot of features that I still don't understand. I am trying to learn everything that it does. I'm just glad I found the program. It cost 200 bucks. Or I can say that cost $200.

#23 Rshen1

 
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Posted 08 June 2011 - 03:26 PM

Greetigs,

I am applying for a goverment job now. I am a 40% disabled veteran but i am not applying as a Disabled veteran so there is no 10 points disabled Preferance invloved.

Do i still have to disclose?

I also thing that the Fed hiring is a fraud.. that is why i dont apply as a disabled vet..

As a recent aggressive job seeker and have gone to several interviews, it depends on the job you are applying to disclose your SC Disability. If it is a government job, yes, because preference is involved. And with preference, you are protected under the laws and policies governed by OPM ( though I think the Fed Hiring system is a fraud , LOL ). If you can ever proved that preference was not used ( yes, good luck with proving an agency was wrong ), you can actually sue them.

If it is a private employer, I may think twice. Unless your disabilities are obvious and blatant, of course disclose your disability. If it effects your job and the safety of others, disclose as well. I just believe that if people don't need to know, they should not. It has been my own experience. The scary reality we are living in right now is that employers are looking for " drama " free employees, especially in this tight job market. And unfortunately, some don't even care if you are a Veteran, let alone a disabled one. It can be a double edge sword.

Regardless, good luck.



#24 john999

 
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Posted 08 June 2011 - 04:12 PM

I would not lie on the application if asked if I am a disabled vet. The whole thing with a disability is "can you do the job with or without accommdation". If nothing about your disability makes it impossible for you to do the main functions of the job they can't legally discriminate. The way it usually works in government and elsewhere is that they will never tell you that they did not hire you because of your disability unless it is obvious like being blind and wanting to drive a truck. Employers are wise to the ADA.

#25 jbasser

 
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Posted 08 June 2011 - 04:32 PM

Greetigs,

I am applying for a goverment job now. I am a 40% disabled veteran but i am not applying as a Disabled veteran so there is no 10 points disabled Preferance invloved.

Do i still have to disclose?

I also thing that the Fed hiring is a fraud.. that is why i dont apply as a disabled vet..


I am going to tell you this so dont take it the wrong way.
What you are doing is foolish. you are in a higher than 10 percent category since you are 40 percent. They cannot discriminate because of a Service conected disability.

Dont let things you have heard or some misdirected thought cost you a Job if you really want it.

You are only hurting yourself.

JBasser

#26 Commander Bob

 
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Posted 08 June 2011 - 04:46 PM

Hi everyone,


...If someone is applying for a job after military retirement and they are disabled (SC), does that have to be disclosed to the employer?  The reason I ask is that many govt jobs ask if you are applying for preference.  Would the employer need to know what your disabilities are, OR, would they just have to know your rating percentage if that?

I would think that some employers might hold having a disability against the potential job seeker in certain instances.  Has anyone had any direct experience with this?

Thanks for the information in advance!

<img src='http://www.hadit.com...DIR#>/smile.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=';)' />



What Government are you seeking employment with??? Why wouldn't you take the "Disabled vet points preference"? Very odd???

I don't mean to pry, but what kind of Gov job are you seeking?

Edited by Commander Bob, 08 June 2011 - 07:01 PM.


#27 Rshen1

 
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Posted 08 June 2011 - 04:59 PM

What Government are seeking employment with??? Why wouldn't you take the "Disabled vet points preference"? Very odd???

I don't mean to pry, but what kind of Gov job are you seeking?


Im trying to get in With DHS Customs and Border Protection Officer..
I applied 2 years ago and have been waiting list to get the call to get hired..
I wasnt a disabled Vet when i applied 2 years ago. and i passed the Medical Phsical..
You just recently got rated as Dis. vet.
My Medical expired and i have to redo my Medical...

I dont want to disclose.. because it will prolong the process,, I will be put on medical hold..
I will get passed over on the list, or i poss. wont get hired at all.. I have seen/ heard this happen many times..
I am just waitin go onthe call to get hired
As you said your self. the Government hiring is a fraud..

I didnt apply as a disable Vet do i have to disclose?

#28 Rshen1

 
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Posted 08 June 2011 - 05:07 PM

They are not suppose to.. but they have and they will.

But anyway when i applieed 2 years ago.. i wanst a disabled vet.. i just recently got rated... now my original Medical expired and i have to redo it.

Idont want to disclose if i dont have to.. I mean i didnt apply as a disabled vet soo





I am going to tell you this so dont take it the wrong way.
What you are doing is foolish. you are in a higher than 10 percent category since you are 40 percent. They cannot discriminate because of a Service conected disability.

Dont let things you have heard or some misdirected thought cost you a Job if you really want it.

You are only hurting yourself.

JBasser



#29 Rshen1

 
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Posted 08 June 2011 - 05:27 PM

I didnt apply as a disabled vet nor was a disabeled vet when i applied back then.. My Medical recently expired and i have to redo it.

Doesnt the ADA say that you dont have to disclose.. unless you need accomidation.. etc..

I know what they law says.. but they discriminate anyway not all the time.. but some times.. ive seen it and heard.. and try proving them wrong or sueing them is next to impossible..

I would not lie on the application if asked if I am a disabled vet. The whole thing with a disability is "can you do the job with or without accommdation". If nothing about your disability makes it impossible for you to do the main functions of the job they can't legally discriminate. The way it usually works in government and elsewhere is that they will never tell you that they did not hire you because of your disability unless it is obvious like being blind and wanting to drive a truck. Employers are wise to the ADA.



#30 Vync

 
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Posted 08 June 2011 - 06:30 PM

I would not lie on the application if asked if I am a disabled vet. The whole thing with a disability is "can you do the job with or without accommdation". If nothing about your disability makes it impossible for you to do the main functions of the job they can't legally discriminate. The way it usually works in government and elsewhere is that they will never tell you that they did not hire you because of your disability unless it is obvious like being blind and wanting to drive a truck. Employers are wise to the ADA.


Mega bump here...

For what it's worth, I called the 1-800 number and asked them to generate a letter validating my disability percentage, but omitting the conditions and compensation amount. When I applied, I turned it in and it did not impair my hiring at all. The employer even sent an ergonomic team to setup my so I could be as comfortable as possible.

#31 Commander Bob

 
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Posted 08 June 2011 - 06:44 PM

Hi everyone,

If someone is applying for a job after military retirement and they are disabled (SC), does that have to be disclosed to the employer?  The reason I ask is that many govt jobs ask if you are applying for preference.  Would the employer need to know what your disabilities are, OR, would they just have to know your rating percentage if that?



I wonder if 'MDB1968NM' ever got that job??? We haven't heard from 'MDB1968NM' since Oct/04/2010 11:31 PM.

Edited by Commander Bob, 08 June 2011 - 06:44 PM.


#32 Vync

 
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Posted 08 June 2011 - 06:47 PM

lol, old topic alert

#33 Commander Bob

 
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Posted 08 June 2011 - 06:54 PM

lol, old topic alert



I agree 'Vync'. However we may be surprised how much it still applies today. Lots of people looking for work. ADA or not ,many disabled workers are still getting kicked to the curb.

Some of the new vets with PTSD have mentioned that they do not want to mention their active duty service during a job interview, for fear of being rejected.

Edited by Commander Bob, 08 June 2011 - 07:03 PM.


#34 carlie

 
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Posted 08 June 2011 - 08:01 PM

I just did a little bit of research on this subject about employment
with the Dept of Homeland Security in Customs and Border Protection.
Here's some copy and paste with some links.
Being that they will for sure check out your military background - they will more likely
than not also find out that you are a SC'd disabled veteran.
This in and of itself might not be a problem - but if you are asked to disclose it anywhere and don't
that may go against your credibility and trustworthiness.
JMHO

One of the forms specifically address mental health issues and the other one for a Secret Security Clearance
says
" Applicants for a secret security clearance must agree to a release of information including background checks, credit checks, and medical history checks. These checks are necessary to ensure that the applicant has no outstanding debt or health problems that could compromise the ability to keep information secret."

Security Clearance for Customs & Border Protection

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is an agency of the Homeland Security Department. It describes its primary mission as "keeping terrorists and their weapons out of the U.S.," but it's also responsible for enforcing drug laws, stemming illegal immigration and facilitating legitimate travel and trade. With all these duties, CBP personnel must have access to sensitive national security information--and, therefore, they need security clearances.

Read more: Security Clearance for Customs & Border Protection | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/...l#ixzz1OjqnCmnP

Background Check

  • All potential CBP employees are required to undergo a background check. Investigators will look at your criminal record, if any, your credit history and legal documents pertaining to such things as bankruptcies, divorces and civil lawsuits. Your citizenship will be checked, your past residences and employment will be verified, and you will be checked for associations with "undesirable individuals or foreign nationals." Neighbors, co-workers and even ex-spouses may be interviewed. Once the check is complete, CBP will make a determination as to whether you are suitable for employment. "Suitability," however, does not mean you qualify for a security clearance. That's a different process.
Applicants will complete the SF 86, the Questionnaire for National Security Positions.

- - - - - - - - -

http://www.ehow.com/...procedures.html

  • Many jobs in the United States Federal Government require security clearances. There are three official security clearances, confidentail, secret, and top secret. Obtaining a security clearance can open up many job possibilities and can also allow a job prospect to command a higher salary. The secret security clearance is the second-highest clearance. These clearances can often take several months to a year to be approved.
Necessary Forms

  • In order to obtain a secret security clearance, each applicant must complete forms sf-86 and fd-258. The sf-86 forms asks the applicant about different information from the past seven years. Form fd-258 requires the applicant to submit their fingerprints.
Residency

  • Secret Security Clearance applicants must provide all of their residences for the past seven years. The applicant must indicate the length of time, including months and years, living in each residence. Included in the residence information, the applicant must list one person that he or she had a relationship with while living there. Depending on who reviews the application, the person listed on the form may be sent a letter, get a phone call, or in some cases even receive a visit from the investigator. The person listed will be asked to answer some general questions about the applicant.
Education

  • An applicant for a secret security clearance must fill out any school attended in the past seven years. The applicant must include the school name, address, degree completed, and someone he or she had a relationship with while enrolled at the school. This person will be contacted by the investigator by mail, phone, or sometimes in a face-to-face meeting.
Employment

  • Each applicant must list all jobs he or she has held in the past seven years, or going back to their eighteenth birthday. The applicant must also include any period of unemployment. Each job must be verified by the employer and a supervisor's name must be given.
Authorization for Release of Information

  • Applicants for a secret security clearance must agree to a release of information including background checks, credit checks, and medical history checks. These checks are necessary to ensure that the applicant has no outstanding debt or health problems that could compromise the ability to keep information secret.
Read more: Secret Security Clearance Criminal Background Procedures | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/...l#ixzz1Ojpb7GfU

Form sf86

http://www.opm.gov/f...f_fill/sf86.pdf

#35 Rshen1

 
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Posted 08 June 2011 - 11:16 PM

Great info thanks so much!

I was under the assumption that the VA and the Military are 2 seperate things.. I Seperated under Honorable Conidtions not a medical discharge.
So if they check my military background nothing would be there..

Also they can not check your Medical records unless you consent to it..Also If i dont list the hospitals i have been to or the conditions i have.. how can they check my Medical Records? Where would they look?

The thing is i didnt apply as a disabled Vet.. and i wasnt when i first applied to years ago.. i just recently got rated.. So i didnt ly when i applied..




[quote name='carlie' timestamp='1307584902' post='247421']
I just did a little bit of research on this subject about employment
with the Dept of Homeland Security in Customs and Border Protection.
Here's some copy and paste with some links.
Being that they will for sure check out your military background - they will more likely
than not also find out that you are a SC'd disabled veteran.
This in and of itself might not be a problem - but if you are asked to disclose it anywhere and don't
that may go against your credibility and trustworthiness.
JMHO

#36 Rshen1

 
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Posted 08 June 2011 - 11:24 PM

I agree 'Vync'. However we may be surprised how much it still applies today. Lots of people looking for work. ADA or not ,many disabled workers are still getting kicked to the curb.

Exactly.. Some of the new vets with PTSD have mentioned that they do not want to mention their active duty service during a job interview, for fear of being rejected.


I currently work for the Federal gover.. and with many verterans.. Many of them do not disclose they have PTSD.. Many of them do not even apply as disabled Vets. for fear of being rejected..

my opinion: If you do not apply as a disabled Vet, You dont need Accomadations, You can pass the physical Requirments and there is no Obvious Disablity..
There should be no need to disclose..unless you want too..

#37 broncovet

 
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Posted 09 June 2011 - 05:50 AM

I agree with Rshen. An example should explain. Lets say a woman Vet has a disability based on MST. Would she be required to tell a potential employer if she was raped in the service? I dont think so. Or, would she even have to use the term "MST"? I know Vets who have PTSD, but you dont know it. They dont want to talk about it..for them, talking about it is a "trigger". This is America and the VA doc's cant "waterboard" or torture Veterans into disclosing illnesses, not legally, anyway. This would include the threat, "If you dont disclose your PTSD before we hire you, we can fire you" There is a difference between lying on your application and exercising your choices on what to disclose. We simply do not have to answer every question presented to us. While an employer could view this as a cantankerous attitude, the employee/applicant also has a choice of whether or not to sue an employer for asking irrelevant, and possibly embarrassing or even illegal questions. I dont even think its legal for an employer to ask you if you are a homosexual, for example.
There is a privacy act...we dont even have to sign a form releasing medical information to the VA. Its optional. I think we should rememeber this, when the VA no doubt wants us to think they have to know every single thing about us, whether or not its related to the disability compensation we are seeking. Of course, the Va is going to make the decision on the information available, and, if the Veteran elects not to sign a release of Information to the Va, he can expect the VA to make a decision on his claim without that information. The VA has to stick its nose in just about every aspect of a Veterans business, and not just health care, either. They expect to know our income, and even its source, to apply for certain benefits.
Frankly, I am appalled at the VA's nosy attitude, especially in light of the fact there have been multiple instances when the VA failed to keep Veterans private information private.
There are things an employer can not ask a potential employee.
We really are entitled to a private life, and many of us do not want to be put under a microscope and to be used for teaching, or whatever purposes the VA or an employer sees fit.

Trust me, I know about office settings and if a Vet had PTSD or MST, there is a good chance that details of it would be leaked to persons (s)he would prefer not to know this.
I am familiar with other disability forums and the general consensus is when applying for a job, the applicant should have the choice whether or not to disclose physical or mental disabilities. If there is a question on the application form "Do you have a disability", I think a person can elect not to answer that question, and not be excluded from consideration based upon his reluctance to answer that question.
Some disabilities are "hidden" in that people not afflicted with them are unlikely to notice. And many disabled people prefer to keep it that way. There is simply no law requiring people to wear a T shirt with details about their disabilities.

#38 carlie

 
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Posted 12 June 2011 - 08:26 PM

IMO what posters are missing here is that this specific employment
falls under Homeland Security.

IMO, any applicant for employment under this agency will/should be
be doing a thorough back ground investigation.
If there are any discrepancies found, between the information attested to on the
application and the investigation findings - this surely leaves warranted question
as to the truthfulness capabilities of the applicant, that would reflect negatively
as to the applicants level of "good moral character" by legal standards.

#39 cooter

 
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Posted 12 June 2011 - 10:13 PM

I have to side with carlie with one other thing besides Homeland Security employment, which I think she hit on a very good point. I'm also an ex Fed. of 31 years, and I'll never forget one episode when a new hire was released from his job. when he filled out his application for hire he didn't expose the fact he was busted on a misdemeanor for possession of a joint. Since it wasn't a Felony, he would of been ok if he told them. Just like your case, he didn't lie, he just didn't disclose it. Everyone who is/has worked for the Feds know they have to be investigated thru the FBI. Thats another reason a new employee starts out on a 1 year probation. JMO





#40 Rshen1

 
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Posted 12 June 2011 - 11:15 PM

I am currently a fed employee..with the DOJ 3 years.. background cleared.. didn't apply as a dis able vet nor do they know.. its none of.there business..
Criminal back ground investigstions are very different..
Can they investigate your medical history? Isn't that confidential? If you don't disclose how.would they know anything bout your medical history? Do they start cold calling hospitals to see if you were a patient there? If you don't list the hospitals you been too or the injuries.. how can they find out..

I have to side with carlie with one other thing besides Homeland Security employment, which I think she hit on a very good point. I'm also an ex Fed. of 31 years, and I'll never forget one episode when a new hire was released from his job. when he filled out his application for hire he didn't expose the fact he was busted on a misdemeanor for possession of a joint. Since it wasn't a Felony, he would of been ok if he told them. Just like your case, he didn't lie, he just didn't disclose it. Everyone who is/has worked for the Feds know they have to be investigated thru the FBI. Thats another reason a new employee starts out on a 1 year probation. JMO