COLA Chatter – 2023 Increase – History’s Highest?

Cost Of Living Increases
Will the 2023 COLA actually keep up with the cost of living?

Lately, there’s lots of chatter about the COLA for next year being the biggest since 1980 when it was 14.3 or 1981 when we received 11.2. Anything in the double digits would be huge for us. It would be a first for me. My VA disability started, in 1991 and my SSDI didn’t start until 1998 I think.

Since 1982, there hasn’t been a cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) above 10%. The last time it happened was, in 1982 when the COLA went up 11.2%.

What is scary is several sources say Americans will stop receiving their full Social Security benefits in 2035 if lawmakers don’t act.

Opinions on what the 2023 COLA are varied:

Yahoo/Finance The Wednesday Consumer Price Index report showed that June’s inflation surged by 9.1%. According to the Senior Citizens League, the COLA (cost-of-living adjustment) for 2023 will be approximately 10.5%. This is great news for seniors struggling to keep up with the rising living costs.

Fool.com According to Mary Johnson, a Social Security policy analyst at The Senior Citizens League (TSCL), a nonpartisan senior advocacy group, the program’s COLA could be as high as 11.4% in 2023 if inflation continues to surge in the third quarter.

Here is a link to Google Search for COLA 2023 so you can keep track of the news on the 2023 COLA as we get closer to its announcement in October 2023.

A bit of background from the SSA.gov site.

History of Automatic Cost-Of-Living Adjustments (COLA)

The COLA is designed to keep your Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits from losing value to inflation. It’s based on the percentage increase in the Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W) from the third quarter of the last year a COLA was determined to the third quarter of the current year. If there’s no increase, there can be no COLA.

The CPI-W is determined by the Bureau of Labor Statistics in the Department of Labor. By law, it is the official measure used by the Social Security Administration to calculate COLAs.

In 1972 Congress enacted Social Security Amendments, and automatic annual COLAs began in 1975. Before that, benefits were increased only when Congress enacted special legislation.

Beginning in 1975, Social Security started automatic annual cost-of-living allowances. The change was enacted by legislation that ties COLAs to the annual increase in the Consumer Price Index (CPI-W).

The change means that inflation no longer drains value from Social Security benefits.

The 1975-82 COLAs were effective with Social Security benefits payable for June (received by beneficiaries in July) in each of those years. After 1982, COLAs have been effective with benefits payable for December (received by beneficiaries in January).

Automatic Cost-Of-Living Adjustments received since 1975

  • July 1975 — 8.0%
  • July 1976 — 6.4%
  • July 1977 — 5.9%
  • July 1978 — 6.5%
  • July 1979 — 9.9%
  • July 1980 — 14.3%
  • July 1981 — 11.2%
  • July 1982 — 7.4%
  • January 1984 — 3.5%
  • January 1985 — 3.5%
  • January 1986 — 3.1%
  • January 1987 — 1.3%
  • January 1988 — 4.2%
  • January 1989 — 4.0%
  • January 1990 — 4.7%
  • January 1991 — 5.4%
  • January 1992 — 3.7%
  • January 1993 — 3.0%
  • January 1994 — 2.6%
  • January 1995 — 2.8%
  • January 1996 — 2.6%
  • January 1997 — 2.9%
  • January 1998 — 2.1%
  • January 1999 — 1.3%
  • January 2000 — 2.5% (1)
  • January 2001 — 3.5%
  • January 2002 — 2.6%
  • January 2003 — 1.4%
  • January 2004 — 2.1%
  • January 2005 — 2.7%
  • January 2006 — 4.1%
  • January 2007 — 3.3%
  • January 2008 — 2.3%
  • January 2009 — 5.8%
  • January 2010 — 0.0%
  • January 2011 — 0.0%
  • January 2012 — 3.6%
  • January 2013 — 1.7%
  • January 2014 — 1.5%
  • January 2015 — 1.7%
  • January 2016 — 0.0%
  • January 2017 — 0.3%
  • January 2018 — 2.0%
  • January 2019 — 2.8%
  • January 2020 — 1.6%
  • January 2021 — 1.3%
  • January 2022 — 5.9%

(1) The COLA for December 1999 was originally determined as 2.4 percent based on CPIs published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Pursuant to Public Law 106-554, however, this COLA is effectively now 2.5 percent.

Hundreds of Thousands of Service Members Deserve the New Atomic Veterans Commemorative Service Medal

Veterans who worked in non-combat nuclear tests now may be eligible for a new medal. At the Department of Defense’s discretion, the “Atomic Veterans Medal” would be given to some of the hundreds of thousands of veterans who worked in non-combat nuclear tests.

The Department of Veterans Affairs will award a new Atomic Veterans Service Medal to those who participated in nuclear testing, clean-up after accidents, and other such endeavors.

The Atomic Veterans Service Medal honors veterans exposed to ionizing radiation during their military service. These veterans served in World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and the Persian Gulf War. Read the Full Story Here

Source: Task and Purpose



2019 Changes to Veterans Benefits State and Federal

New State Veteran Benefits in 2019

California

California will extend a handgun purchasing ban for those under 21 to long guns. Military members may be excluded from this ban.

Georgia

Effective Jan. 1, 2019, military firefighter training will be accepted as required basic training for full-time, part-time and volunteer firefighters, including airport firefighters.

Military members who become delinquent on license fees or special, occupation or sales taxes can have the 10 percent penalty waived if they were unable to pay due to military service in a combat zone. This waiver applies only to combat-zone duty, and the taxpayer must provide proof of military service and make full payment of the taxes within 60 days of their return from military service.

Illinois

Veterans and active-duty military members who are believed to have physical or mental health problems may now be considered “high risk” if they go missing. This makes it easier for law enforcement to locate missing veterans and expedites the missing person report.

Health-care facilities must provide a free copy of a homeless veteran’s medical records when requested by the veteran or an authorized agent for the purpose of supporting a claim for disability benefits.

Indiana

National Guard members from Indiana or an adjoining state who attend an Indiana public university are entitled to a tuition refund or credit and guaranteed re-enrollment if they are called to active duty during an academic term.

Sailors from any state who serve on the new USS Indiana submarine for at least 180 days are entitled to pay in-state tuition at Indiana’s public universities if they enroll within one year of receiving an honorable discharge.

Disabled military veterans who do not desire to have a disabled veteran license plate but would like to use disability parking can obtain a placard to hang from their rearview mirror.

New Hampshire

The property tax credit for service-connected total disability will increase from $2,000 to $4,000.

New York

Under the New York Paid Family Leave act, workers will now get 10 weeks of paid time off to bond with a newborn, adopted or fostered child; to care for family members with serious health conditions; or to address issues related to a family member’s military deployment.

Oregon

On Jan. 1, 2019, the Oregon Equal Pay Act became effective. It guarantees that people receive equal pay regardless of age, disability, heritage, race, color, sexual orientation and veteran or marital status.

Federal Veteran Benefit Changes for 2019

GI Bill

A provision of the Forever GI Bill that provides more benefits for science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) Programs will become effective Aug. 1, 2019.

The VA will provide up to nine additional months of Post-9/11 GI Bill coverage to certain eligible individuals who are enrolled in a STEM program and use up all their GI Bill benefits.

This applies only to veterans who already have completed at least 60 semester or 90 quarter hours and are in a STEM program that requires more than the standard 128 semester or 192 quarter hours for a degree.

The VA can pay up to nine additional months of GI Bill benefits or $30,000, whichever is less. Those using the Yellow Ribbon program and dependents using transferred benefits are not eligible.

Space-A Travel

Disabled veterans with a 100-percent disability rating are now eligible for Space-A travel.

https://www.military.com/militaryadvantage/2019/01/07/disabled-veterans-can-now-fly-space.html
Have a Question About Space-A Travel?

For Questions on Space-A Travel, Please Contact the Closest AMC Passenger Terminal or the Terminal At the Location You Intend to Depart From.  Your local TMO/ITO may also be able to provide Official Travel Information.

New UCMJ Article

Article 128b will be added to the Uniform Code of Military Justice, addressing domestic violence. It includes assault, intimidation, violation of a protective order, and damaging property or injuring animals in a domestic-assault situation.

More UCMJ changes can be found here.

High-Deployment Allowance for Reservists

A new law adds reservists mobilized under Section 1104(b) to those eligible for the high-deployment allowance of up to $1,000 per month.

New Tricare Retiree Dental Program

The big news in Tricare coverage is the replacement of the Tricare Retiree Dental Plan (TRDP) with the FEDVIP program. Also, family members of active-duty personnel are now eligible for vision insurance through FEDVIP.

VA Burial Benefits: Service-Connected or Non-Service Connected – There’s a Benefit for You

How to Apply for a Veterans Burial Allowance

Source: VA.gov

Find out how to get Veterans burial allowances to help cover burial, funeral, and transportation costs.

Can I get allowances to help pay for a Veteran’s burial and funeral costs?

You may be able to get burial allowances if you’re paying for the burial and funeral costs, and if any of the below relationships or professional roles describes your connection to the Veteran.

One of these must describe your relationship or role. You’re:

  • The Veteran’s surviving spouse (Note: we recognize same-sex marriages), or
  • A surviving child of the Veteran, or
  • A parent of the Veteran, or
  • The executor or administrator of the Veteran’s estate (someone who officially represents the Veteran)

To get this benefit, the Veteran must NOT have received a dishonorable discharge, and one of the below circumstances must be true.

One of these must be true of the Veteran. They:

  • Died as a result of a service-connected disability (a disability related to service), or
  • Had been getting a VA pension or compensation when they died, or
  • Had chosen to get military retired pay instead of compensation, or
  • Died while getting VA care, either at a VA facility or at a facility contracted by VA, or
  • Died while traveling to approved VA care, or
  • Died with a reopened claim for VA compensation or a pension that would have qualified them to get benefits, or
  • Died on or after October 9, 1996, while a patient at a VA-approved state nursing home

Note: Veterans Affairs will also provide an allowance for the cost of transporting a Veteran’s remains for burial in a national cemetery.

When do I need to file a claim?

You must file a claim for a non-service-connected burial allowance within 2 years after the Veteran’s burial or cremation. If a Veteran’s discharge was changed after death from dishonorable to another status, you must file for an allowance claim within 2 years after the discharge update.

There’s no time limit to file for a service-connected burial, plot, or interment allowance.

What kind of benefits can I get?

  • An allowance for burial and funeral costs
  • An allowance for the plot or interment
  • An allowance for transporting the Veteran’s remains for burial in a national cemetery

What documents and information do I need to apply?

You may need a copy of:

  • The Veteran’s military discharge papers (DD214 or other separation documents)
  • The Veteran’s death certificate
  • Any documents you have for the cost of transporting the Veteran’s remains

How do I apply?

You can apply online right now. Apply for Burial Benefits

You can also apply:

By mail
Apply by mail using an Application for Burial Benefits (VA Form 21P-530). 
Download VA Form 21P-530.

Mail the application and other paperwork to your nearest VA regional benefit office. 
Find your nearest VA regional benefit office.

If you have questions, call 1-800-827-1000, Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. (ET). Our TTY number for people with hearing impairments is 711. Or call your VA regional benefit office.


Burial Allowance Amounts

What are the burial allowance amounts for a service-connected death?

StatusMaximum Burial Allowance
If the Veteran died on or after September 11, 2001$2,000
If the Veteran died before September 11, 2001$1,500
If the Veteran is buried in a VA national cemeteryWe may pay you back for some or all of the costs of moving the Veteran’s remains

What are the burial allowance amounts for a non-service-connected death?

StatusMaximum Burial Allowance
If the Veteran died on or after October 1, 2017We’ll pay a $300 burial allowance and $762 for a plot
If the Veteran died on or after October 1, 2016We’ll pay a $300 burial allowance and $749 for a plot
If the Veteran died on or after October 1, 2015We’ll pay a $300 burial allowance and $747 for a plot
If the Veteran died on or after October 1, 2014, but before October 1, 2015We’ll pay a $300 burial allowance and $745 for a plot
If the Veteran died on or after October 1, 2013, but before October 1, 2014We’ll pay a $300 burial allowance and $734 for a plot

What are the burial allowance amounts if the Veteran was hospitalized by VA at the time of their death?

StatusMaximum Burial Allowance
If the Veteran died on or after October 1, 2017We’ll pay a $762 burial allowance and $762 for a plot
If the Veteran died on or after October 1, 2016We’ll pay a $749 burial allowance and $749 for a plot
If the Veteran died on or after October 1, 2015We’ll pay a $747 burial allowance and $747 for a plot
If the Veteran died on or after October 1, 2014, but before October 1, 2015We’ll pay a $745 burial allowance and $745 for a plot
If the Veteran died on or after October 1, 2013, but before October 1, 2014We’ll pay a $734 burial allowance and $734 for a plot
  • We may also pay you back for some or all of the costs of moving the Veteran’s remains if they were hospitalized or in a VA-contracted nursing home at the time of death.
  • We may pay you back for some or all of the costs of moving the Veteran’s remains if they died while traveling to VA-authorized care.

Note: If a Veteran’s remains aren’t claimed, we’ll pay the person or organization responsible for the Veteran’s burial a $300 burial allowance. If the deceased qualifies, we may pay you back for the costs of moving the Veteran’s remains to a VA national cemetery.

Medallions for Veterans Buried in Private Cemeteries

Bronze Medallions

The Department of Veterans Affairs provides a medallion, by request, to be affixed to an existing, privately purchased headstone or marker to signify the deceased’s status as a Veteran.

This device is furnished in lieu of a traditional Government headstone or grave marker for those Veterans who served on or after Apr. 6, 1917 and whose grave in a private cemetery is marked with a privately purchased headstone or marker.

Why choose a medallion: Bronze medallions are durable and can be easily affixed to privately purchased headstones by anyone, avoiding headstone or marker setting fees. The medallion also offers a way to identify the grave as that of a Veteran when a cemetery only allows one headstone per grave, preventing the use of a standard VA marker as a footstone.

Bronze Medallion Sizes: The medallion is available in three sizes: Large(6-3/8”W x 4-3/4”H x 1/2”D), Medium (3-3/4”W x 2-7/8”H x 1/4″D) and Small (2”W x 1-1/2”H x 1/3”D). Each medallion is inscribed with the word “VETERAN” across the top and the branch of service at the bottom.

Medal of Honor Medallion Sizes: The Medal of Honor (MOH) Medallion comes in Medium and Large. Each medallion is inscribed with “MEDAL OF HONOR” at the top and the branch of service at the bottom.

To request a medallion, please use VA Form 40-1330M, Claim for Government Medallion for Placement in a Private Cemetery. When requesting the MOH Medallion, check “OTHER” in block 11 and specify MOH.

Once a claim for a medallion is received and approved, VA will mail the medallion along with a kit that will allow the family or the staff of a private cemetery to affix the device to a headstone, grave marker, mausoleum or columbarium niche cover.

Important: This benefit is only applicable if the grave is marked with a privately purchased headstone or marker. In these instances, eligible Veterans are entitled to either a traditional Government-furnished headstone or marker, or the new medallion, but not both.

For family members of eligible Veterans interested in submitting a claim for the medallion, instructions on how to apply for a medallion are available. Please use: 

Social Security Disability Insurance Benefits Overview – Hill & Ponton

I’ve had friends, family, clients that have needed to file for disability, and for the right reasons. They’re very sick or whatever it may be, and they really did not realize that they had to have worked five out of the past 10 years. They thought maybe because they had worked 20 years, and they had stopped, that they would still be eligible, and that is not the case. So it is really important to realize that you have to have worked five out of the most recent past 10 years to be eligible.

Video Blog – Disability Insurance Benefits Overview

Am I eligible for emergency care at a non-VA facility?

Emergency Medical Care

During a medical emergency, Veterans should immediately seek care at the nearest medical facility. A medical emergency is an injury, illness or symptom so severe that without immediate treatment, you believe your life or health is in danger.

The following is from VA’s community care page located here.

Veterans Affairs Emergency Care

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2gkfgd31Ifk

Veterans do not need to check with VA before calling for an ambulance or going to an emergency department. During a medical emergency, VA encourages all Veterans to seek immediate medical attention without delay. A claim for emergency care will never be denied based solely on VA not receiving notification prior to seeking care.

It is, however, important to promptly notify VA after receiving emergency care at a community emergency department. Notification should be made within 72 hours of admission to a community medical facility. This allows VA to assist the Veteran in coordinating necessary care or transfer, and helps to ensure that the administrative and clinical requirements for VA to pay for the care are met.

IMPORTANT: An emergency department (ED) is a facility that is staffed and equipped to provide emergency treatment and does not include community facilities that provide medical treatment in situations other than emergencies.

VA Payments for Emergency Transportation
VA can pay for emergency transportation provided by a community provider for a Veteran’s service-connected condition and nonservice-connected condition, but there are specific requirements that must be met before VA can reimburse these costs*.

Service-Connected Emergency Care

In general, VA can pay for emergency medical care at a local ED for a Veteran’s service-connected condition, or if the care is related to a Veteran’s service-connected condition. Specifically, emergency medical care for a Veteran’s service-connected or related (adjunct) condition(s) is eligible for VA payment as long as the VA wasn’t reasonably available to provide the care.

In accordance with the following situations and requirements, VA can pay emergency care costs for:

  1. A Veteran who receives emergency treatment of a service-connected, or adjunct condition* in a community emergency department; OR
  2. A Veteran who is Permanently and Totally disabled (P&T) as the result of a service-connected condition is eligible for emergency treatment of ANY condition; OR
  3. A Veteran who is participating in a VA Vocational Rehabilitation Program, and who requires emergency treatment to expedite their return to the program, is eligible for emergency treatment for any condition; AND (scenarios 1-3 must all meet #4)
  4. The emergency was of such a nature that the Veteran (or other prudent layperson without medical training) would reasonably believe that any delay in seeking immediate medical attention would cause their life or health to be placed in jeopardy.

NOTE: A service-connected condition is one that has been adjudicated by the Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) and a disability rating has been granted. An adjunct condition is one that, while not directly service-connected, is medically considered to be aggravating a service-connected condition. Legal authorities and payment methods for VA payment for emergency care for service-connected conditions are contained in Title 38 U.S.C. §172838 CFR §17.120 and 38 CFR §17.132.

Nonservice-Connected Emergency Care

VA can also pay for emergency medical care at a community ED for a Veteran’s nonservice-connected condition. However, there are several requirements and factors that affect the extent to which VA can cover those services. Specifically, emergency medical care for a Veteran’s nonservice-connected condition(s) is eligible for VA payment when all of the following five elements are true:

  1. Care was provided in a hospital emergency department (or similar public facility held to provide emergency treatment to the public); AND
  2. The emergency was of such a nature that the Veteran (or other prudent layperson without medical training) would reasonably believe that any delay in seeking immediate medical attention would cause their life or health to be placed in jeopardy; AND
  3. A VA medical facility or another Federal facility was not reasonably available to provide the care; AND
  4. The Veteran is enrolled and has received care within a VA facility during the 24 months before the emergency care; AND
  5. The Veteran is financially liable to the provider of emergency treatment.

There are limitations on VA’s ability to provide coverage when a Veteran has other health insurance (OHI). If OHI does not fully cover the costs of treatment, VA can pay certain costs for which the Veteran is personally liable. By law, VA cannot pay copayments, coinsurance, deductibles, or similar payments a Veteran may owe to the provider as required by their OHI.

VA is also legally prohibited from providing coverage for individuals covered under a health plan contract because of a failure by the Veteran or the provider to comply with the provisions of that health plan contract, e.g., failure to submit a bill or medical records within specified time limits, or failure to exhaust appeals of the denial of payment.

NOTE: Legal authorities and payment methods for VA payment for emergency care for nonservice-connected conditions are contained in Title 38 U.S.C. §1725 and 38 CFR §17.1000.

Emergency Care in Foreign Counties

VA can pay for emergency medical care outside the United States if the emergency is related to a Veteran’s service-connected condition. Contact the Foreign Medical Program at 1-877-345-8179 or visit our Foreign Medical Program page for more information.

Foreign Medical Program

After Receiving Care

Once a Veteran’s immediate emergency medical care needs have been addressed, the Veteran, a family member, friend, or hospital staff member should contact the nearest VA medical facility within 72 hours. Once notified, VA staff will assist the Veteran and/or his/her representatives in understanding eligibility and how eligibility relates to services rendered in the community. VA staff will also ensure that, if desired, the Veteran is transferred to a VA medical center upon stabilization and that the Veteran is set up to receive additional care, post discharge, without interruption.

IMPORTANT: When a Veteran receives emergency medical care, notifying VA as quickly as possible is always best. It ensures maximum VA coverage and assists the VA in providing the Veteran with the care they need.

Filing a Claim

Claims for emergency medical care should be submitted to VA as soon as possible after care has been provided. The deadline for filing a claim depends on whether care was provided for a service-connected condition or a nonservice-connected condition. The charts below describe the requirements, how to file a claim, and payment rates.

Requirements for filing an emergency care claim

Veterans/Veterans’ RepresentativesProviders
Veterans or their personal representatives may file a claim for reimbursement of emergency treatment costs that they have incurred and paid to the provider.

In this situation, Veterans should obtain and submit all related treatment and billing records to the closest VA medical facility.In most cases, providers will submit a claim directly to VA, and the Veteran will not have to take further action.
Submit claims for services not preauthorized by VA to the VA medical facility closest to where the emergent treatment was provided.

Submission must include a standard billing form (such as a CMS 1450 or CMS 1500), containing false claims notice.Submit claims via Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) transaction (such as an 837I or 837P).Documentation related to the medical care may be required prior to claim processing.

Filing deadlines for emergency care claims

Service-Connected ConditionNonservice-Connected Condition
Claims must be submitted to VA within two (2) years of the date emergency medical care was received. However, filing the claim as soon as possible after care has been provided is highly recommended because it helps ensure that all required documentation is readily available and that providers receive their payment in a timely manner.Claims must be submitted to VA within 90 days of the date of discharge, or 90 days from the date that all attempts to receive required payments from a liable third party are completed and not successful in eliminating the Veteran’s personal liability to the provider. A liable third party includes other health insurers, worker’s compensation, civil litigation, etc.

Filing deadlines for emergency care claims

Service-Connected ConditionNonservice-Connected Condition
Claims must be submitted to VA within two (2) years of the date emergency medical care was received. However, filing the claim as soon as possible after care has been provided is highly recommended because it helps ensure that all required documentation is readily available and that providers receive their payment in a timely manner.Claims must be submitted to VA within 90 days of the date of discharge, or 90 days from the date that all attempts to receive required payments from a liable third party are completed and not successful in eliminating the Veteran’s personal liability to the provider. A liable third party includes other health insurers, worker’s compensation, civil litigation, etc.

Payment rates for emergency care claims

Service-Connected ConditionNonservice-Connected Condition
Generally, 100% Medicare ratesGenerally, 70% Medicare rates

Receiving Payment from VA

Once a claim for emergency treatment is received by VA, the claim will be administratively reviewed to determine Veteran eligibility. If the Veteran meets the administrative eligibility criteria to receive emergency care in the community, the treatment documentation will then be reviewed by VA clinical staff to determine if the treatment received meets the clinical criteria necessary for VA to pay for the care.

VA makes every effort to adjudicate claims for emergency treatment quickly and accurately. When further information or clarification is needed by VA, claims processing may be delayed.

If a Veteran is charged for emergency care received in the community and believes the charges should be covered by VA, they should contact the nearest VA medical facility as soon as possible. VA staff will assist the Veteran in understanding eligibility and in determining whether the bill received is appropriate. VA will assist the Veteran and work to resolve any billing issues with the community provider.

Resources

VA Co-Payment Requirements 2017

 

IB10 431 Copay Requirements At A Glance

Basic Business Rule
No extended care copayment when income is below pension single rate threshold.
*Copayment Free Care and Medication for treatment of Service-Connected (SC) disabilities, SC 50% or more, former POWs, Catastrophically Disabled Veterans, VA pensioners, and those under Special Authorities (e.g. PG 6, military sexual trauma, nasopharyngeal radium irradiation).
**Copayment for extended care services for former POWs when care provided is for a NSC condition.
***Veterans determined by VA to be Catastrophically Disabled (CD) are exempted from inpatient, outpatient and prescription copayments. CD Veterans are also exempt
from copayments applicable to the receipt of non-institutional respite care, non-institutional geriatric evaluation, non-institutional adult day health care, Homemaker/Home Health Aide, Purchased Skilled Home Care, Home based Primary Care, and any other non-institutional alternative extended care services. Co-payment for other extended care services (ex. Nursing Home Care) not mentioned still apply.
***A&A and HB – For Veterans who are not in receipt of a VA Pension, but requires the aid and attendance (A&A) of another person or is permanently housebound (HB), the income limits for determining the exemption from outpatient medication copayment requirements and the eligibility for bene ciary travel bene ts will be based on the maximum annual rate of pension as Identi ed in VHA Fact Sheet IB10-497.
****Exposure Treatment Authorities: Care authorized under 38 U.S.C. 1710(e) for Vietnam-era herbicide exposed Veterans, radiation-exposed Veterans, Gulf War Veterans, post-Gulf War combat exposed Veterans or Camp Lejeune Veterans.
OEF/OIF/OND Combat Veterans Enhanced Eligibility for Health Care Bene ts
Combat Veterans discharged from active duty on or after January 28, 2003, are eligible for enrollment in Priority Group (PG) 6 for 5 years following discharge unless eligible for a higher enrollment priority (PG 1-5). After the special eligibility period ends, these Veterans will be reassigned to appropriate PG and subject to copayments, if applicable.
Copayments only applicable for PG 6 Combat Veteran enrollees for care related to a condition that is congenital or developmental e.g., scoliosis existed before military service (unless aggravated by combat service) or has a speci c ailment that began after military service, such as a common cold, etc.
Comprehensive Medical Bene ts Package
All enrolled Veterans have a comprehensive medical bene ts package, which VA administers through an annual patient enrollment system. The enrollment system is based on priority groups to ensure health care bene ts are readily available to all enrolled Veterans. Enrollment in the VA health care system provides Veterans with the assurance that comprehensive health care services will be available when and where they are needed during that enrollment period.

 
 

Veterans Preference Hiring in the Federal Government

Veterans Preference Hiring in the Federal Government Kellie Lunney, senior correspondent for Government Executive, spoke by phone about competing legislative efforts to both limit and expand “veterans preference” hiring practices by the federal government.
https://www.c-span.org/video/?413723-101/veterans-preference-hiring-federal-government

Disabled Veterans Property Tax Exemptions by State

Alabama
A disabled veteran in Alabama may receive a full property tax exemption on his/her primary residence if the veteran is 100 percent disabled as a result of service and has a net annual income of $12,000 or less.

Alaska
A disabled veteran in Alaska may receive a property tax exemption of up to the first $150,000 of the assessed value of his/her primary residence if the veteran is 50 percent or more disabled as a result of service.

Arizona
A disabled veteran in Arizona may receive a property tax exemption of $3,000 on his/her primary residence if the total assessed value does not exceed $10,000.

Arkansas
A disabled veteran in Arkansas may receive a full property tax exemption on his/her primary residence if the veteran is blind in one or both eyes, lost the use of one or more limbs or is 100 percent disabled as a result of service.

California
A disabled veteran in California may receive a full property tax exemption on his/her primary residence if the full value does not exceed $150,000, household income does not exceed $40,000 and the veteran is blind in both eyes, lost the use of two or more limbs or is 100 percent disabled as a result of service.

Colorado
A disabled veteran in Colorado may receive a property tax exemption of 50 percent of the first $200,000 of the actual value of his/her primary residence if the veteran is 100 percent disabled.

VA Claims: Forum Chat Message Discuss Talk

Connecticut
A disabled veteran in Connecticut may receive a property tax exemption on his/her primary residence of $1,500 if 10-25 percent disabled and $3,000 if 75-100 percent disabled. In addition, a veteran that is blind in both eyes or lost the use of two or more limbs as a result of service is eligible for a $10,000 exemption. Veterans that lost the use of one limb receive a $5,000 exemption.

Delaware
There are currently no state-mandated property tax exemptions for disabled veterans in Delaware.

Florida
A disabled veteran in Florida may receive a property tax exemption of $5,000 on any property he/she owns if 10 percent or more disabled and a full exemption if 100 percent disabled as a result of service.

Georgia
A disabled veteran in Georgia may receive a property tax exemption of up to $60,000 or more on his/her primary residence, depending on a fluctuating index rate set by the U.S. Secretary of Veterans Affairs.

Hawaii
A disabled veteran in Hawaii may receive a full property tax exemption on his/her primary residence if the veteran is 100 percent disabled as a result of service.

Idaho
A disabled veteran in Idaho may receive a property tax exemption on his/her primary residence if the veteran is 100 percent or more disabled as a result of service. The exemption amount is determined based on income.

Illinois
A qualified disabled veteran in Illinois with a disability of at least 30-50% will receive a $2,500 reduction in EAV; those with 50-70% can receive a $5,000 exemption; and those with 70% or more pay no property tax.

Indiana
A disabled veteran in Indiana may receive a property tax exemption of up to $37,440 on his/her primary residence depending on the percent of disability, age and length of service. If the veteran is 100 percent disabled or is 62 years old or older with at least a 10 percent disability as a result of service.

Iowa
A veteran in Iowa may receive a property tax exemption of $1,852 on his/her primary residence if the veteran served on active duty during a period of war or for a minimum of 18 months during peacetime.

Kansas
A disabled veteran in Kansas may receive a property tax exemption on his/her primary residence if the veteran is 50 percent or more disabled as a result of service. The exemption amount is determined based on income.

Kentucky
A disabled veteran in Kentucky may receive a property tax exemption of up to $36,000 on his/her primary residence if the veteran is 100 percent disabled as a result of service.

Louisiana
A disabled veteran in Louisiana may receive a property tax exemption of up to the first $150,000 of the assessed value of his/her primary residence if the veteran is 100 percent disabled as a result of service.

Maine
A disabled veteran in Maine may receive a property tax exemption of up to $6,000 on his/her primary residence if the veteran is 62 years or older or is 100 percent disabled.

Maryland
A disabled veteran in Maryland may receive a property tax exemption on his/her primary residence if the veteran is 100 percent disabled as a result of service. The exemption amount is determined by the Maryland Department of Veterans Affairs.

Massachusetts
A disabled veteran in Massachusetts may receive a property tax exemption on his/her primary residence of $400 if 10 percent disabled, $750 the veteran lost the use of one hand, one foot or one eye, $1,250 if the veteran lost the use of both hands, both feet or a combination of the two, or if the veteran is blind in both eyes as a result of service. A veteran may receive a $1,000 exemption if 100 percent disabled as a result of service.

Michigan
A disabled veteran in Michigan may receive a full property tax exemption on his/her primary residence if the veteran is 100 percent disabled as a result of service.

Minnesota
A disabled veteran in Minnesota may receive a property tax exemption of up to $300,000 on his/her primary residence if the veteran is 100 percent disabled as result of service. Veterans with a disability rating of 70 percent or more may receive an exemption of up to $150,000.

Mississippi
A disabled veteran in Mississippi may receive a property tax exemption on his/her primary residence if the assessed value is $7,500 or less and the veteran is 100 percent disabled as a result of service.

Missouri
A disabled veteran in Missouri may receive a property tax exemption on his/her primary residence if the veteran is 100 percent disabled as a result of service.

Montana
A disabled veteran in Montana may receive a property tax exemption on his/her primary residence if the veteran is 100 percent disabled as a result of service. The exemption amount varies based on income and marital status, as determined by the Montana Department of Revenue.

Nebraska
A disabled veteran in Nebraska may receive a full property tax exemption on his/her primary residence if the veteran is 100% disabled regardless of property value, income level or if the disability resulted from service.

Nevada
A disabled veteran in Nevada may receive a property tax exemption of up to $20,000 of the assessed value of his/her primary residence if the veteran is 60 percent or more disabled as a result of service.

New Hampshire
A disabled veteran in New Hampshire may receive a full property tax exemption on his/her primary residence if the veteran is 100 percent disabled, has lost two or more limbs or is blind in both eyes as a result of service.

New Jersey
A disabled veteran in New Jersey may receive a full property tax exemption on his/her primary residence if the veteran is 100 percent disabled as a result of service.

New Mexico
A disabled veteran in New Mexico may receive a full property tax exemption on his/her primary residence if the veteran is 100 percent disabled as a result of service.

New York
A disabled veteran in New York may receive a property tax exemption on his/her primary residence. The exemption amount varies based on type of service and disability, as determined by the New York State Division of Veterans Affairs.

North Carolina
A disabled veteran in North Carolina may receive a property tax exemption of up to the first $45,000 of the appraised value of his/her primary residence if the veteran is

100 percent disabled as a result of service.

North Dakota
A disabled veteran in North Dakota may receive a property tax exemption of up to the first $120,000 on his/her primary residence if the veteran is 50 percent or more disabled as a result of service.

Ohio
A disabled veteran in Ohio may receive a property tax exemption of $50,000 on his/her primary residence if the veteran is 100 percent disabled as a result of service.

Oklahoma
A disabled veteran in Oklahoma may receive a full property tax exemption on his/her primary residence if the veteran is 100 percent disabled as a result of service.

Oregon
A disabled veteran or surviving spouse in Oregon may receive a property tax exemption on his/her primary residence if the veteran is 40 percent or more disabled as a result of service. The exemption amount varies annually according to income.

Pennsylvania
A disabled veteran in Pennsylvania may receive a property tax exemption on his/her primary residence if the veteran is 100 percent disabled as a result of service. The exemption amount varies.

Rhode Island
A disabled veteran in Rhode Island may receive a property tax exemption on his/her primary residence. The exemption amount varies based on city and the value of the property.

South Carolina
A disabled veteran in South Carolina may receive a property tax exemption if the veteran is 100 percent disabled as a result of service. Contact county tax offices for more information.

South Dakota
A disabled veteran in South Dakota may receive a property tax exemption of up to $100,000 of his/her primary residence if the veteran is 100 percent disabled as a result of service.

Tennessee
A disabled veteran in Tennessee may receive a property tax exemption of up to the first $100,000 of his/her primary residence if the veteran is 100 percent disabled, his/her income does not exceed $60,000, has lost the use of two or more limbs or is blind in both eyes as a result of service.

Texas
A disabled veteran in Texas may receive a property tax exemption of up to $12,000 on his/her primary residence, depending on the severity of the disability incurred as a result of service. A full property tax exemption is available for veterans who are 100 percent disabled as a result of service.

Utah
A disabled veteran in Utah may receive a property tax exemption on his/her primary residence if the veteran is 10 percent or more disabled as a result of service. A veteran that is 100 percent disabled may receive an exemption of $244,064. A veteran that is 50 percent disabled may receive an exemption of $122,032, while a veteran that is 10 percent disabled may receive an exemption of $24,406.

Vermont
A disabled veteran in Vermont may receive a property tax exemption of at least $10,000 on his/her primary residence if the veteran is 50 percent or more disabled as a result of service. The exemption amount varies by city.

Virginia
A disabled veteran in Virginia may receive a full property tax exemption on his/her primary residence if the veteran is 100 percent disabled as a result of service.

Washington
A disabled veteran in Washington may receive a property tax exemption on his/her primary residence if the veteran is 100 percent disabled as a result of service. The exemption amount is based on income, as determined by the Washington State Department of Veterans Affairs.

West Virginia
A 100 percent disabled veteran or any veteran over the age of 65 is exempted from paying the taxes on the first $20,000 of assessed value on a self-occupied property.

Wisconsin
A disabled veteran in Wisconsin may receive a property tax exemption on his/her primary residence if the veteran is 100 percent disabled as a result of service. The exemption amount varies.

Wyoming
A disabled veteran in Wyoming may receive a property tax exemption of $3,000 of the assessed value of his/her primary residence if the veteran was disabled as a result of service.

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The Best States for Veterans