VA Claims: Disabled Veterans Community|Hadit.com

Tinnitus – it’s a brain malady…

Neuroscientists believe they have discovered your dysfunction. Or, more accurately, your neural mechanisms dysfunction. They “gate” noise controlling the noise and pain signals. You see. there are “circuit breakers” that should work, but are not.

After an injury tinnitus can occur and sufferers experience phantom sounds. Veterans are exposed to some very loud noises and there are times that ear protection is not practical, among veterans claimed disabilities tinnitus has been the top disability receiving compensation for at least the past 2 years. Compounding the problem of tinnitus and the pain it brings is an increased risk for depression and anxiety. Two disabilities that veterans are at risk for.

It’s a pretty interesting article, I hope you enjoy it.

In the October issue of Trends in Cognitive Sciences, researchers say identifying the problem is the first step to developing effective therapies for these disorders, which afflict millions of people. None now exist.

The scientists describe how the neural mechanisms that normally “gate” or control noise and pain signals can become dysfunctional, leading to a chronic perception of these sensations. Neuroscientists reveal the brain malady responsible for tinnitus, chronic pain

Further Reading

VA disability claims for noise-related hearing loss or tinnitus, there are certain things you’ll want to do to help your case:

  1. Provide detailed statements that explain the noise exposure you experienced during your military service.
  2. Cite the sources of the noise such as the machinery you used or the environment you worked in.
  3. Cite the duration of the exposure, and explain the type of hearing protection available for use (including no protection).

All related Tinnitus Information Click Here

https://www.news-medical.net/news/20150924/Neuroscientists-reveal-the-brain-malady-responsible-for-tinnitus-chronic-pain.aspx

List By Symptom – VA Disability Compensation

In March 2020 the VA removed the DBQ’s from their website. NVLSP.org has made them available to the public here
See above, the links below currently are broken, since the VA removed the DBQ’s
Disability Benefits Questionnaire (DBQ) Veterans now have more control over the disability claims process. Veterans have the option of visiting a private health care provider instead of a VA facility to complete their disability evaluation form.
Veterans can have their providers fill out any of the more than 70 DBQs that are appropriate for their conditions and submit them to us. It’s that easy!
Source: www.benefits.va.gov
Current as of 09/05/207 Check here for the latest Disability Benefits Questionnaire (DBQ) 

Cardiovascular

Conditions – SymptomsForm Name
Evaluation of varicose veins, arterial diseases, producing swelling, claudication of legs, or pain on walking, skin/nail changesArtery and Vein Conditions (Vascular Diseases including varicose veins)
Evaluation of high blood pressure (BP): how to determine significance of BP readings or BP reading abnormalities.Hypertension
Conditions including: heart attack (MI), irregular rhythm, heart murmurs and heart surgery.Heart Conditions (Including IHD, Non-IHD, Arrhythmias Valvular Disease and Cardiac Surgery)

Dental and Oral

Conditions – SymptomsForm Name
Evaluation of all dental and oral conditions, except TMJ Conditions.Dental and Oral Conditions
Evaluation of conditions affecting the TMJ joint with pain in the jaw when biting and clicks and sounds in the jaw.Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) Conditions

Dermatological

Conditions – SymptomsForm Name
Evaluation for infectious and non-infectious diseases of the skin: how to evaluate rashes, spots, athlete’s foot, sweating, and acne skin lesions.Skin Diseases
Evaluation of palpable or disfiguring scars, producing distortion or asymmetry.Scars and Disfigurement

Ear, Nose, and Throat

Conditions – SymptomsForm Name
Evaluation of various conditions of the ear including: infections, dizziness, vertigo, acoustic tumors and other conditions with ringing in the ears (tinnitus).Ear Condition (including: Vestibular and Infectious Conditions)
Evaluation of Anosmia (inability to detect any odor), Hyposmia (reduced ability to detect odors), Ageusia (complete lack of taste), Hypogeusia (decrease in sense of taste) and other conditions affecting the sense of smell and taste.Loss of Sense of Smell and/or Taste
Evaluation of conditions affecting, the sinuses, nose, throat, larynx, and pharynx, including, but not limited to deviated nasal septum and organic aphonia, vocal chord problems.Sinusitis, Rhinitis, and other Conditions of the Nose, Throat, Larynx, and Pharynx

Endocrinological

Conditions – SymptomsForm Name
Evaluation of DM Type I or II, with alteration of blood sugar regulation, abnormal Glucose Tolerance Test (GTT), requiring medication or hospitalization or complications.Diabetes Mellitus (DM)
Evaluation of conditions affecting the hormone glands, including, but not limited to Cushing’s syndrome, Acromegaly, and Addison’s Disease.Endocrine Diseases (other than Thyroid and Parathyroid, or Diabetes Mellitus)
Evaluation of conditions affecting the functions regulated by the thyroid and parathyroid glands, including, but not limited to growth and metabolism.Thyroid and Parathyroid Conditions

Gastrointestinal

Conditions – SymptomsForm Name
Evaluation of conditions affecting the esophagus such as stricture, spasm, or other conditions with lump in throat or chest, pain on swallowing, or regurgitation.Esophageal Conditions (including GERD, Hiatal Hernia, and Other Esophageal Disorders)
Evaluation of gallbladder disease, with inflammation, gallstones, pain after eating fatty food, or pancreatic conditions including pancreatitis that manifests as severe recurrent abdominal pain.Gallbladder and Pancreas Conditions
Evaluation of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) (chronic recurrent diarrhea or constipation). Ulcerative colitis (chronic inflammatory bowel condition leading to erosions and bleeding) and other conditions with Bloody stools, fistulas, and/or abscess.Intestinal Conditions (other than surgical or infectious) including Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Crohn’s Disease, Ulcerative Colitis, and Diverticulits
Evaluation of hepatitis (which refers to a variety of inflammatory and infectious conditions) and Cirrhosis (chronic liver disease resulting from liver injury leading to degeneration of the liver)and other conditions characterized by jaundice, ascitis, fluid retention.Hepatitis, Cirrhosis and Other Liver Conditions
Evaluation of peritoneal adhesions, which are scars of the visceral lining of the abdominal structures that produces episodes of partial or complete bowel obstruction.Peritoneal Adhesions
Evaluation of stomach and duodenum conditions such as peptic ulcer disease, recurrent pain relieved by antacids, bloody stools, nausea or vomiting, indigestion.Stomach and Duodenum Conditions (not including GERD or Esophageal Disorders)
Evaluation of Amebiasis, dysentery, and various types of intestinal parasites with recurrent diarrhea, alteration in stool consistency or foul smell.Infectious Intestinal Disorders, including Bacterial and Parasitic Infections
Evaluation of removal of portions of the intestine and reconstruction and diversion of the intestinal tract: bowel diversion that requires use of external bags to collect stool.Intestinal Surgery (Bowel Resection, Colostomy, and Ileostomy)

Genitourinary

Conditions – SymptomsForm Name
Evaluation of renal diseases including Nephritis, renal insufficiency, and other diseases of the kidney: kidney failure, abnormal kidney function tests, protein in the urine, edema, kidney stones.Kidney Conditions (Nephrology)
Evaluation of diseases of the urethra, penis, testes, and scrotum, producing pain on urination, swelling, blood in urine or incontinence.Male Reproductive Organ Conditions
Evaluation of malignant lesions of the prostate gland with frequent diurnal or nocturnal urination.Prostate Cancer
Evaluation of conditions affecting the bladder and urethra, including, but not limited to voiding dysfunctions and infections.Urinary Tract (Bladder and Urethra)

Gynecological

Conditions – SymptomsForm Name
Evaluation of inflammatory neoplastic and cystic lesions of the breast: Breast mass or lumps.Breast Conditions and Disorders
Evaluation of diseases of the female genital tract including: uterus, vagina, cervix, ovaries, endometriosis, complications of pregnancy, and other conditions.Gynecological Conditions

Hematologic and Lymphatic

Conditions – SymptomsForm Name
Evaluation of conditions of red and white blood cells, producing anemias, leukemias on tumors such as lymphomas.Hematologic and Lymphatic Conditions

Infectious Diseases

Conditions – SymptomsForm Name
Evaluation of conditions associated with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and its treatment.HIV-Related Illnesses
Evaluation of infectious diseases not specifically-associated with either HIV or military service in a tropical area, the Persian Gulf, or Afghanistan.Infectious Diseases
Evaluation of infectious diseases associated with military service in tropical areas with exposure to salmonella, shigella, etc. producing symptoms such as chronic diarrhea.Persian Gulf and Afghanistan Infectious Diseases
Evaluation of conditions in which the immune system begins attacking healthy body tissues, including, but not limited to, Goodpasture’s syndrome and Guillain-Barre syndrome.Systemic Lupus Erthematosus (SLE) and Other Autoimmune Diseases
Evaluation of pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis symptoms.Tuberculosis (TB)
For use in evaluation of vitamin deficiencies (Beriberi, Pellagra, syndromes of dermatitis, diarrhea dementia in POW, post-GI surgery, bypass procedures, undernutrition and malabsorption.)Nutritional Deficiencies

Musculoskeletal

Conditions – SymptomsForm Name
Evaluation of extremity, limb or digit (complete or partial amputation), and complications. Evaluation of stumps.Amputations
Evaluation of ankle pain, persistent deformity (ankylosis), ankle injuries, reduction of movement, and use of assistive device.Ankle Conditions
Evaluation for non-degenerative arthritic conditions such as Gout and Rheumatoid Arthritis: recurrent painful and swollen joints.Non-degenerative Arthritis (including Inflammatory, Autoimmune, Crystalline, and Infectious Arthritis) and Dysbaric Osteonecrosis
Evaluation of injuries, deformities, loss of elbow and forearm producing motion limitation.Elbow and Forearm Conditions
Evaluation of reduction or loss of toe function and motion, and alteration in mobility.Foot conditions including flatfoot (pes planus)
Evaluation of alteration in motion of the wrists or digits due to tendon or muscle injuries, and alteration in motion and function of the hand including ankylosis, trigger finger, loss of finger movement.Hand and Finger Conditions
Evaluation of alteration in extension and flexion, poor postural and body support, and alteration of rotation of the hip.Hip and Thigh Conditions
Evaluation of ankylosis of the knee, subluxation of the knee, knee instability, meniscus lesions, and functional limitations knee cartilage problems, locked knee.Knee and Lower Leg Conditions
Evaluation of traumatic and other injuries resulting in loss or alteration of function, location, type, tears, and weakness: torn scarred muscles.Muscle Injuries
Evaluation of bone infections producing fever, local alteration of function, residuals from a bone infection with persistent drainage or bone alterationOsteomyelitis
Evaluation of arm limitation of function, dislocation, alteration in joint function, incomplete movements, deformity, dislocation, nonunion, and fracture complications : frozen shoulder.Shoulder and Arm Conditions
Evaluation of arthritis and neck deformities.Neck (Cervical Spine) Conditions
Evaluation of unfavorable or incomplete wrist motion due to ankylosis (limitation in range), painful or other alteration in function, resulting from traumatic or other injury complications, joint replacement.Wrist Conditions
Evaluation of chronic low back pain, arthritis and back injuries, spinal conditions or disc disease: low back pain with sciatica.Back (Thoracolumbar Spine) Conditions

Neurological

Conditions – SymptomsForm Name
Evaluation of progressive degenerative disease of the brain and spinal cord with progressive muscle weakness and wasting, speech, swallowing and breathing problems.Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s Disease)
Evaluation of alteration of the function of the nerves (motor and sensory), related to Diabetes Mellitus: weakness, numbness, tingling of legs and arms related to diabetes.Diabetic Sensory-Motor Peripheral Neuropathy
Evaluation of numerous other neurologic conditions such as: meningitis, HIV, brain abscess, Lyme Disease, encephalitis, stroke, brain tumor, and spinal cord injury.Central Nervous System and Neuromuscular Diseases (except TBI, ALS, Parkinson’s Disease, MS, Headaches, TMJ, Epilepsy, Narcolepsy, Peripheral Nerves, Sleep Apnea, Cranial Nerves, Fibromyalgia, and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome)
Evaluation of conditions affecting the following nerves in the Cranium: V (trigeminal, VII (facial), IX (glossopharyngeal), X (vagus), XI (spinal accessory), and XII (hypoglossal). (Conditions affecting cranial nerves I (olfactory), II (optic), III (oculomotor), IV (trochlear), VI(abducens), and VIII (vestibulocochlear (auditory)) are addressed in other DBQs.)Cranial Nerve Conditions
Evaluation of recurrent episodes of head pain producing work limitation or incapacitation: with other symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, tearing etc.Headaches (including Migraine Headaches)
Evaluation of fibromyalgia components, including, but not limited to sleep problems, muscle and joint pain, and altered affect.Fibromyalgia
Evaluation of disorders of the myelin sheath of the central nervous systems producing recurrent alterations of neurological function: such as weakness, numbness, urine incontinence, visual symptoms.Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
Evaluation of symptoms that may include tremors, or trembling in hands, arms, legs, jaw, and face; rigidity, or stiffness of the limbs and trunk; bradykinesia, or slowness of movement; and postural instability, or impaired balance and coordination. Other symptoms may include depression and other emotional changes; difficulty in swallowing, chewing, and speaking; urinary problems or constipation; skin problems; and sleep disruptions.Parkinson’s Disease
Evaluation of narcolepsy components, including, but not limited to, sleep attacks, sleepiness, paralysis, and cataplexy.Narcolepsy
Evaluation of alteration of the function of Nerves associated with metabolic disorders, exposure to toxins, infections, immunological disorders, or inflammation and other conditions.Peripheral Nerve Conditions (not including Diabetes Sensory-Motor peripheral Neuropathy)
Evaluation of seizure conditions including epilepsy.Seizure Disorders

Ophthalmological

Conditions – SymptomsForm Name
Evaluation of various diseases of the eye, such as inflammation, infection, glaucoma, deformities, alteration of tear ducts, cataracts, retina disease, and other conditions.Eye Conditions

Psychological

Conditions – SymptomsForm Name
Evaluation for anorexia, bulimia, and other eating disorders.Eating Disorders
Evaluation of symptoms, history, and impact related to mental disorders: depression, mood and affective disorders, psychosis, etc.Mental Disorders (other than PTSD)
Evaluation of beginning and extent of symptoms (acute – length of symptoms is usually less than 3 months, chronic – symptoms usually last 3 months or more, with delayed onset – usually at least 6 months have passed between the traumatic experience and the beginning of symptoms). Symptoms may include: recurrent experiences of a traumatic event, avoiding an excitant or irritant associated with the trauma, deadening of general responsiveness, increased arousal, including insomnia, recurrent nightmares, and extreme caution; exhibiting an inflated frightened response; and experiencing changes in hostility..Review Evaluation of PTSD

Respiratory

Conditions – SymptomsForm Name
Evaluation of the respiratory system except Sleep Apnea and Tuberculosis.Respiratory Conditions (other than TB and Sleep Apnea)
Evaluation of disorder characterized by cessation of breathing during sleep and provides information necessary to determine functional impact (sleep apnea, snoring) daytime complications.Sleep Apnea

Rheumatological Diseases

Conditions – SymptomsForm Name
Evaluation of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Components including but not limited to tiredness, loss of memory or concentration and enlarged lymph nodes.Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

General Surgical

Conditions – SymptomsForm Name
Evaluation of conditions involving internal organs bulging through the muscle, except hiatal hernia.Hernias (including Abdominal, Inguinal, and Femoral Hernias)
Evaluation of rectum and anus conditions causing alteration of sphincter control, stricture of prolapse, fistula, and other symptoms. Bowel incontinence or severe constipation blood in stools.Rectum and Anus Conditions (including Hemorrhoids)

Further Reading:

ptsd Please review my C&P Sleep Apnea DBQ – Veterans …

https://community.hadit.com › … › Veterans Compensation & Pension Exams

 

Mar 27, 2017 – Posted March 27, 2017. Hello guys, please let me know what you think about my Sleep Apnea DBQ, hopefully this is enough to get my service connected? 30% or 50%?. Sleep Apnea Disability Benefits Questionnaire. Is this DBQ being completed in conjunction with a VA 21-2507, C&P Examination. Request? [X] Yes [ ] No.

How Long Does A Gulf War Illness C&p Exam Take? – Veterans …

https://community.hadit.com › … › Veterans Compensation & Pension Exams

 

3 days ago – Depends on what you are claiming. If you are claiming a multitude injuries/ symptoms/benefits then it could take that long. What will happen in the exam: The doctor/nurse/pa, etc. will have your claimed disabilities and will exam/question you for for each one according to the DBQ(Disability Questionnaire) for the particular …

DBQ Chronic Adjustment disorder – Veterans Compensation Benefits …

https://community.hadit.com › … › Veterans Compensation & Pension Exams

 

Jun 1, 2017 – Well not to sure how this will pan out any ideas? Will they finally seperate my PTSD/ AD from my TBI maybe maybe not ones getting a call to the complaint line if not? I was just found Permanent and total two days ago with this claim still pending I’m still awaiting the award letter. I’m hoping this won’t hurt my PT due that I …

Michigander – Veterans Compensation Benefits Claims – Hadit.com

https://community.hadit.com/profile/24501-michigander/

 

Nov 19, 2017 – $400 that she recommended she knew and for me to go to and have a DBQ filled out to file my claim. I chose to ignore that advice and began reading up and asking questions on the Hadit site. With the help on Hadit and on the podcast I was able to educate myself and file my claim even as a FDC (Fully Developed Claim).

Is it me or is my claim moving really fast? – Veterans Compensation …

https://community.hadit.com › … › Veterans Compensation Benefits Claims Research

 

3 days ago – Posted June 22, 2016. I filed a claim for bilateral lower extremity radiculopathy secondary to lower back and the doctor said it was caused by a foot fracture :). The DBQ is on MyHealthVet. I just checked ebenefits and the status has changed to Pending Decision Approval with an estimated completion date 6/28/16 to 7/2/ 16.

Leaderboard – Veterans Compensation Benefits Claims

https://community.hadit.com/leaderboard/

 

Dec 31, 2017 – I submitted PTSD DBQ along with other evidence as a FDC claim. Thanks so much, and I really appreciate all the support from Hadit. Been a long couple of years, but I am so grateful for you guys, and the fact the Military and Govt is admitting what they put me thru. Hope you all have a Happy New Year, and God Bless!!!

MST Claim – I have started the journey – Veterans Compensation …

https://community.hadit.com › Specialized Claims › MST – Military Sexual Trauma

 

May 5, 2017 – My exam is tomorrow… and I just looked at the letter for the C&P and the exam time allows for 2 hours and it has a section for the examiner of “Special clinic instructions”. Services Requested: DBQ PSYCH PTSD initial (1), DBQ Medical Opinion-BH: PSYCH PTSD initial (1), DBQMedical Opinion – BH: PSYCH PTSD Initial 2 …

C&P Exams for Back, Hips and Knees, could someone review and …

https://community.hadit.com › … › Veterans Compensation & Pension Exams

 

Jun 11, 2017 – Back (Thoracolumbar Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire. Name of patient/Veteran: Is this DBQ being completed in conjunction with a VA 21-2507 , C&P Examination Request? [X] Yes [ ] No. ACE and Evidence Review ————- ———- Indicate method used to obtain medical information to complete this …

LHI C&P exams never received by VA (they say) – Veterans …

https://community.hadit.com › … › Veterans Compensation Benefits Claims Research

 

3 days ago – Hello all. Any idea how to get LHI (contractor) C&P exam results? The VA over the phone says they never received the DBQ’s which have now pasted the due date. Called both places I had the exams at and left a voicemail. The day of exams both places said they would be sent in within 24 hours of exam so I guess they …

Secondary Conditions: How to file? – Veterans Compensation Benefits …

https://community.hadit.com › … › Veterans Compensation Benefits Claims Research

 

1 day ago – The veteran can go ahead and get the medical opinion/DBQ for each proposed secondary condition, with adequate medical rationale and appropriate jargon (” as likely as not”, “more likely than not”, or “due to/caused by”). Once all 3 requirements are met, they could go ahead and file a fully developed claim. If the medical …

History of PTSD in Veterans: Civil War to DSM-5 by Matthew J. Friedman, MD, PhD Senior Advisor and former Executive Director, National Center for PTSD

[no_toc]Exposure to traumatic experiences has always been a part of the human condition. Attacks by saber tooth tigers or twenty-first century terrorists have likely led to similar psychological responses in survivors of such violence. Literary accounts offer the first descriptions of what we now call posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). For example, authors including Homer (The Iliad), William Shakespeare (Henry IV), and Charles Dickens (A Tale of Two Cities) wrote about traumatic experiences and the symptoms that followed such events.

The PTSD diagnosis has filled an important gap in psychiatry in that its cause was the result of an event the individual suffered, rather than a personal weakness. PTSD became a diagnosis with influence from a number of social movements, such as Veteran, feminist, and Holocaust survivor advocacy groups. Research about Veterans returning from combat was a critical piece to the creation of the diagnosis. War takes a physical and emotional toll on Servicemembers, families, and their communities. So, the history of what is now known as PTSD often references combat history.

Early attempts at a medical diagnosis

Accounts of psychological symptoms following military trauma date back to ancienttimes. The American Civil War (1861-1865) and the Franco-Prussian War (1870-1871) mark the start of formal medical attempts to address the problems of military Veterans exposed to combat. European descriptions of the psychological impact of railroad accidents also added to early understanding of trauma-related conditions.
 

Nostalgia, Soldier’s Heart, and Railway Spine

Prior to U.S. military efforts, Austrian physician Josef Leopold (1761) wrote about “nostalgia” among soldiers. Among those who were exposed to military trauma, some reported missing home, feeling sad, sleep problems, and anxiety. This description of PTSD-like symptoms was a model of psychological injury that existed into the Civil War.
 
A second model of this condition suggested a physical injury as the cause of symptoms. “Soldier’s heart” or “irritable heart” was marked by a rapid pulse, anxiety, and trouble breathing. U.S. doctor Jacob Mendez Da Costa studied Civil War soldiers with these “cardiac” symptoms and described it as overstimulation of the heart’s nervous system, or “Da Costa’s Syndrome.” Soldiers were often returned to battle after receiving drugs to control symptoms.
The thought that physical injury led to PTSD-like symptoms was supported by European reports of “railway spine.” As rail travel became more common, so did railway accidents. Injured passengers who died had autopsies that suggested injury to the central nervous system. Of note, Charles Dickens was involved in a rail accident in 1865 and wrote about symptoms of sleeplessness and anxiety as a result of the trauma.

Shell Shock

In 1919, President Wilson proclaimed November 11th as the first observance of Armistice Day, the day World War I ended. At that time, some symptoms of present-day PTSD were known as “shell shock” because they were seen as a reaction to the explosion of artillery shells. Symptoms included panic and sleep problems, among others. Shell shock was first thought to be the result of hidden damage to the brain caused by the impact of the big guns. Thinking changed when more soldiers who had not been near explosions had similar symptoms. “War neuroses” was also a name given to the condition during this time.
During World War I, treatment was varied. Soldiers often received only a few days’ rest before returning to the war zone. For those with severe or chronic symptoms, treatments focused on daily activity to increase functioning, in hopes of returning them to productive civilian lives. In European hospitals, “hydrotherapy” (water) or “electrotherapy” (shock) were used along with hypnosis.

Battle Fatigue or Combat Stress Reaction (CSR)

In World War II, the shell shock diagnosis was replaced by Combat Stress Reaction (CSR), also known as “battle fatigue.” With long surges common in World War II, soldiers became battle weary and exhausted. Some American military leaders, such as Lieutenant Gen. George S. Patton, did not believe “battle fatigue” was real. A good account of CSR can be found in Stephen Crane’s Red Badge of Courage, which describes the acute reaction of a new Union Army recruit when faced with the first barrage of Confederate artillery.
Up to half of World War II military discharges were said to be the result of combat exhaustion. CSR was treated using “PIE” (Proximity, Immediacy, Expectancy) principles. PIE required treating casualties without delay and making sure sufferers expected complete recovery so that they could return to combat after rest. The benefits of military unit relationships and support became a focus of both preventing stress and promoting recovery.

Development of the PTSD diagnosis

In 1952, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) produced the first Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-I), which included “gross stress reaction.” This diagnosis was proposed for people who were relatively normal, but had symptoms from traumatic events such as disaster or combat. A problem was that this diagnosis assumed that reactions to trauma would resolve relatively quickly. If symptoms were still present after six months, another diagnosis had to be made.
Despite growing evidence that trauma exposure was associated with psychiatric problems, this diagnosis was eliminated in the second edition of DSM (1968). DSM-II included “adjustment reaction to adult life” which was clearly insufficient to capture a PTSD-like condition. This diagnosis was limited to three examples of trauma: unwanted pregnancy with suicidal thoughts, fear linked to military combat, and Ganser syndrome (marked by incorrect answers to questions) in prisoners who face a death sentence.
In 1980, APA added PTSD to DSM-III, which stemmed from research involving returning Vietnam War Veterans, Holocaust survivors, sexual trauma victims, and others. Links between the trauma of war and post-military civilian life were established.
The DSM-III criteria for PTSD were revised in DSM-III-R (1987), DSM-IV (1994), DSM-IV-TR (2000), and DSM-5 (2013) to reflect continuing research. One important finding, which was not clear at first, is that PTSD is relatively common. Recent data shows about 4 of every 100 American men (or 4%) and 10 out every 100 American women (or 10%) will be diagnosed with PTSD in their lifetime.
An important change in DSM-5, is that PTSD is no longer an Anxiety Disorder. PTSD is sometimes associated with other mood states (for example, depression) and with angry or reckless behavior rather than anxiety. So, PTSD is now in a new category, Trauma- and Stressor-Related Disorders. PTSD includes four different types of symptoms: reliving the traumatic event (also called re-experiencing or intrusion); avoiding situations that are reminders of the event; negative changes in beliefs and feelings; and feeling keyed up (also called hyperarousal or over-reactive to situations). Most people experience some of these symptoms after a traumatic event, so PTSD is not diagnosed unless all four types of symptoms last for at least a month and cause significant distress or problems with day-to-day functioning.

Today and tomorrow

Today VA operates more than 200 specialized programs for the treatment of PTSD. In Fiscal Year (FY) 2013, more than a half million Veterans diagnosed with PTSD received treatment at VA medical centers and clinics.
VA is committed to provide the most effective, evidence-based care for PTSD. It has created programs to ensure VA clinicians receive training in state-of-the-art treatments for PTSD. At of the end of FY 2013, VA had trained more than 5000 of its clinicians to use Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) or Prolonged Exposure (PE), which are cited by the Institute of Medicine Committee on Treatment of PTSD as proven to be effective treatments for PTSD.
VA’s National Center for PTSD was created in 1989 by an act of Congress, and celebrated its 25th anniversary on August 29, 2014. We continue to be at the forefront of progress in the scientific understanding and treatment of PTSD. In addition to improving upon existing treatments, we are researching effective new treatments. We are also developing new educational products such as our What is PTSD?whiteboard video. For more information on the National Center for PTSD, please visit our About Us section of the website.

Sources

National Center for PTSD May 2017
Portions of this fact sheet originally appeared in a Veterans Day observance post on VA’s blog, VAntage Point (November 7, 2013). For more information about the history of the PTSD diagnosis, see PTSD History and Overview in the Professional Section of our website.

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