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VA Claims: Disabled Veterans Community|Hadit.com
Search HadIt.com For VA Disability Claim Information

Search HadIt.com For VA Disability Claim Information

Got a VA disability claims question? Search for it.

Your Answer Is Waiting.

  • The search bar below is powered by Google, so the same queries you would use in Google will work in our here.
  • The second option is to ask your question in our VA Claims Research Forums.
  • Below the search bar are examples we hope will help you get the most out of your search.

Search Examples

VA Disability Calculator, Agent Orange Symptoms, VA Form 21-0958, Development Letter Sent, Moved to Pending Decision, and so on.

When searching or posting to the forums, follow these tips.

Post a clear title like 

  • ‘Need help preparing PTSD claim’ or
  • “VA med center won’t schedule my surgery” instead of ‘I have a question.
  • People scan titles very quickly, so posting a clear question will elicit more responses.
  • Most folks don’t read all posts every day and tend to gravitate to those topics that are familiar to them or interest them.
  • Putting the right Topic Title will make it easier for those familiar with your question to spot it quickly and respond.
  • Use paragraphs instead of one huge, rambling introduction or story.
  • Please don’t type in ALL CAPS. It makes it difficult to read. This is all about readability. We are sensitive that some posters’ disabilities make typing difficult, and we are not talking about them.
  • If you are not sure where paragraphs go, just break your post into short, readable chunks. Leading to:
  • Post clear questions and then give background info on them.
  • Example: Too little information.
  • I was previously denied for apnea – Should I re-file a claim?
  • Clear, concise background with a question, excellent.
  • I was diagnosed with apnea in service and received a CPAP machine, but the claim was denied in 2008. Should I refile?
  • Too little information.
  • I may have PTSD- how can I be sure?
  • Clear, concise background with a question, excellent.
  • I was involved in a traumatic incident on base in 1974 and have had nightmares ever since, but I did not go to mental health while enlisted. How can I get help?

This gives members a starting point to ask clarifying questions like “Can you post the Reasons for Denial from your claim?” etc. Interested in the power of search? 

Become a search expert

Want more tips and tricks to help you search like a pro? Check out the links below to learn more advanced search techniques. Google Advanced Search Choosing the right search terms is the key to finding the information you need. Start with the obvious – if you’re looking for general information on Veterans, try Veterans. But it’s often advisable to use multiple search terms; if you’re looking for veterans benefits information, you’ll do better with veterans benefits than with either benefits or veterans by themselves. And veterans benefits dental may produce even better results. You might also ask yourself if your search terms are sufficiently specific. It’s better to search on veterans hospitals in California than on veterans hospitals. But choose your search terms carefully; Google looks for the search terms you chose, so veterans hospitals in California will probably deliver better results than “where can get veterans to get medical care in California”

Capitalization

Google searches are NOT case sensitive. Regardless of how you type them, all letters will be understood as lower case. For example, searches for george washington, George Washington, and gEoRgE wAsHiNgToN will all return the same results.

Automatic “and” queries

By default, Google only returns pages that include all of your search terms. There is no need to include “and” between terms. Keep in mind that the order in which the terms are typed will affect the search results. To restrict a search further, just include more terms. For example, to find veterans’ compensation information, simply type veterans compensation. Automatic exclusion of common words Google ignores common words and characters such as “where” and “how,” as well as certain single digits and single letters because they tend to slow down your search without improving the results. Google will indicate if a common word has been excluded by displaying details on the results page below the search box.

If a common word is essential to getting the results you want, you can include it by putting a “+” sign in front of it. (Be sure to include a space before the “+” sign.)

Another method for doing this is conducting a phrase search, which simply means putting quotation marks around two or more words. Common words in a phrase search (e.g., “where are you”) are included in the search. For example, “Vietnam veteran” will return results where those two words appear together without the quotes results, which would reflect pages that included both Vietnam and veteran but not necessarily together.

Word variations (stemming)

Google now uses stemming technology. Thus, when appropriate, it will search not only for your search terms but also for words that are similar to some or all of those terms. If you search for pet lemur dietary needs, Google will also search for pet lemur diet needs and other related variations of your terms. Any variants of your terms that were searched for will be highlighted in the snippet of text accompanying each result.

Phrase searches

Sometimes you’ll only want results that include an exact phrase. In this case, simply put quotation marks around your search terms. Phrase searches are particularly effective if you’re searching for proper names (“George Washington”), lyrics (“the long and winding road“), or other famous phrases (“This was their finest hour”).

Negative terms

If your search term has more than one meaning (bass, for example, could refer to fishing or music) you can focus your search by putting a minus sign (“-“) in front of words related to the meaning you want to avoid. For example, here’s how you’d find pages about bass-heavy lakes but not bass-heavy music. Note: When you include a negative term in your search, be sure to include a space before the minus sign. 

Worth A Read – Five Ways Google Is Your Friend by Benjamin Krause from DisabledVeterans.org

eBenefits Development Letter Sent

eBenefits Development Letter Sent

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What does it mean? eBenefits development letter Sent.

An eBenefits development letter is generated and sent in the early stages of your claim. It acknowledges your claim and asks for additional evidence if you have any. The VA is legally required to send this letter to you. see 38CFR3.159

(a) Definitions. For purposes of this section, the following definitions apply: (1) Competent medical evidence means evidence provided by a person who is qualified through education, training, or experience to offer medical diagnoses, statements, or opinions. Competent medical evidence may also mean statements conveying sound medical principles found in medical treatises. It would also include statements contained in authoritative writings such as medical and scientific articles and research reports or analyses. (2) Competent lay evidence means any evidence not requiring that the proponent have specialized education, training, or experience. Lay evidence is competent if it is provided by a person who has knowledge of facts or circumstances and conveys matters that can be observed and described by a layperson. 38CFR3.159

The letter may ask for things that don’t apply to your case, like buddy statements, or it may ask for items you’ve already submitted, like medical records. The development letter will also contain blank forms. Most likely, you filled out all the required forms already. The blank forms are only attached if you have additional evidence you want to submit. You do not have to send in everything the VA asks for; you only have to send anything you haven’t already submitted.
NOTE: VA.gov and eBenefits describe the claims process differently, but the status and other details are correct in both places.

What do the “3 Phases of Claim Status” mean in eBenefits?

  • Development – This is the initial part of the claims process. The claimant is provided information as to what information is needed for the claim and an opportunity to provide or identify any additional evidence to support the claim. All appropriate evidence is gathered and reviewed.
  • Decision – All information and evidence are carefully reviewed to ensure we have everything we need to make an informed decision on the claim. If something is missing, the claim returns to the development phase to obtain that missing information. A proposed decision will be made if all the needed evidence is received.
  • Notification – Once the decision is reviewed carefully and approved, a notification letter is sent to the claimant.

You may go from Pending Decision to Gathering Evidence and back to Pending Decision in a day or a week. Know that it is crazy-making, that it is normal, and that you are not alone.

Claims Process

Your claim can go from any step to back a step depending on the specifics of the claim, so you may go from Pending Decision Approval back to Review of Evidence. Ebenefits status is helpful but not definitive.

Stages of a Claim

There are eight distinct steps that most claims for disability compensation follow. These phases may vary in time depending on the complexity of the claim, the amount of evidence that must be gathered to support the claims, and the type of evidence. You are strongly encouraged to submit your claim with as much evidence as possible to help minimize processing time. The eight steps of claims processing are as follows:

Steps

  1. Claim Received 
    Your claim has been received by Veterans Affairs. If you applied online with VONAPP Direct Connect, you should see a receipt in your list of Open Claims within one hour. If you applied through U.S. mail, please allow mailing time plus one week for us to process and record the receipt of your claim.
  2. Under Review 
    Your claim has been assigned to a Veterans Service Representative and is being reviewed to determine if additional evidence is needed. If we do not need any additional information, your claim will move directly to the Preparation for Decision phase. Read More about Under Review from the VA Disability Claims Forum
  3. Gathering of Evidence
    The Veterans Service Representative will request evidence from the required sources. Requests for evidence may be made of you, a medical professional, a government agency, or another authority. It is common for claims to return to this phase should additional evidence be required. Preparation for Decision phaseRead More about Gathering of Evidence from the VA Disability Claims Forum
  4. Review of Evidence
    We have received all the needed evidence. If, upon review, it is determined that more evidence is required, the claim will be sent back to the review of Evidence phaseRead More about Review of Evidence from the VA Disability Claims Forum
  5. Preparation for Decision 
    The Veterans Service Representative has recommended a decision and is preparing the required documents detailing that decision. If more evidence is required, the claim will be sent back in the process for more information or evidence. Read More about Preparation for Decision from the VA Disability Claims Forum
  6. Pending Decision Approval 
    The recommended decision is reviewed, and a final award approval is made. If it is determined that more evidence or information is required, the claim will be sent back in the process for more information or evidence. Read More About Pending Decision Approval from the VA Disability Claims Forum.
  7. Preparation for Notification
    Your entire claim decision packet is prepared for mailing. Preparation for the Decision phaseRead More about Preparation for Notification from the VA Disability Claims Forum
  8. Complete
    The VA has sent a decision packet to you by U.S. mail. The packet includes details of the decision or award. Please allow standard mailing time for your packet to arrive before contacting a VA call center. Preparation for the Decision phaseRead More about Complete from the VA Disability Claims Forum

Status Messages a Final Note

Your claim can go from any step to back a step depending on the specifics of the claim, so you may go from Pending Decision Approval back to Review of Evidence. eBenefits status is helpful but not definitive.

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What does it mean? eBenefits development letter Sent.

An eBenefits development letter is generated and sent in the early stages of your claim. It acknowledges your claim and asks for additional evidence if you have any. The VA is legally required to send this letter to you. see 38CFR3.159

(a) Definitions. For purposes of this section, the following definitions apply: (1) Competent medical evidence means evidence provided by a person who is qualified through education, training, or experience to offer medical diagnoses, statements, or opinions. Competent medical evidence may also mean statements conveying sound medical principles found in medical treatises. It would also include statements contained in authoritative writings such as medical and scientific articles and research reports or analyses. (2) Competent lay evidence means any evidence not requiring that the proponent have specialized education, training, or experience. Lay evidence is competent if it is provided by a person who has knowledge of facts or circumstances and conveys matters that can be observed and described by a layperson. 38CFR3.159

The letter may ask for things that don’t apply to your case, like buddy statements, or it may ask for items you’ve already submitted, like medical records. The development letter will also contain blank forms. Most likely, you filled out all the required forms already. The blank forms are only attached if you have additional evidence you want to submit. You do not have to send in everything the VA asks for; you only have to send anything you haven’t already submitted.
NOTE: VA.gov and eBenefits describe the claims process differently, but the status and other details are correct in both places.

What do the “3 Phases of Claim Status” mean in eBenefits?

  • Development – This is the initial part of the claims process. The claimant is provided information as to what information is needed for the claim and an opportunity to provide or identify any additional evidence to support the claim. All appropriate evidence is gathered and reviewed.
  • Decision – All information and evidence are carefully reviewed to ensure we have everything we need to make an informed decision on the claim. If something is missing, the claim returns to the development phase to obtain that missing information. A proposed decision will be made if all the needed evidence is received.
  • Notification – Once the decision is reviewed carefully and approved, a notification letter is sent to the claimant.

You may go from Pending Decision to Gathering Evidence and back to Pending Decision in a day or a week. Know that it is crazy-making, that it is normal, and that you are not alone.

Claims Process

Your claim can go from any step to back a step depending on the specifics of the claim, so you may go from Pending Decision Approval back to Review of Evidence. Ebenefits status is helpful but not definitive.

Stages of a Claim

There are eight distinct steps that most claims for disability compensation follow. These phases may vary in time depending on the complexity of the claim, the amount of evidence that must be gathered to support the claims, and the type of evidence. You are strongly encouraged to submit your claim with as much evidence as possible to help minimize processing time. The eight steps of claims processing are as follows:

Steps

  1. Claim Received 
    Your claim has been received by Veterans Affairs. If you applied online with VONAPP Direct Connect, you should see a receipt in your list of Open Claims within one hour. If you applied through U.S. mail, please allow mailing time plus one week for us to process and record the receipt of your claim.
  2. Under Review 
    Your claim has been assigned to a Veterans Service Representative and is being reviewed to determine if additional evidence is needed. If we do not need any additional information, your claim will move directly to the Preparation for Decision phase. Read More about Under Review from the VA Disability Claims Forum
  3. Gathering of Evidence
    The Veterans Service Representative will request evidence from the required sources. Requests for evidence may be made of you, a medical professional, a government agency, or another authority. It is common for claims to return to this phase should additional evidence be required. Preparation for Decision phaseRead More about Gathering of Evidence from the VA Disability Claims Forum
  4. Review of Evidence
    We have received all the needed evidence. If, upon review, it is determined that more evidence is required, the claim will be sent back to the review of Evidence phaseRead More about Review of Evidence from the VA Disability Claims Forum
  5. Preparation for Decision 
    The Veterans Service Representative has recommended a decision and is preparing the required documents detailing that decision. If more evidence is required, the claim will be sent back in the process for more information or evidence. Read More about Preparation for Decision from the VA Disability Claims Forum
  6. Pending Decision Approval 
    The recommended decision is reviewed, and a final award approval is made. If it is determined that more evidence or information is required, the claim will be sent back in the process for more information or evidence. Read More About Pending Decision Approval from the VA Disability Claims Forum.
  7. Preparation for Notification
    Your entire claim decision packet is prepared for mailing. Preparation for the Decision phaseRead More about Preparation for Notification from the VA Disability Claims Forum
  8. Complete
    The VA has sent a decision packet to you by U.S. mail. The packet includes details of the decision or award. Please allow standard mailing time for your packet to arrive before contacting a VA call center. Preparation for the Decision phaseRead More about Complete from the VA Disability Claims Forum

Status Messages a Final Note

Your claim can go from any step to back a step depending on the specifics of the claim, so you may go from Pending Decision Approval back to Review of Evidence. eBenefits status is helpful but not definitive.

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