Veterans Suicide – An American Legion White Paper

Suicide prevention is a top priority of The American Legion.
Deeply concerned about the number of military veterans who take their own lives at rates higher than that of the general population, the nation’s largest organization of wartime veterans established a Suicide Prevention Program under the supervision of its TBI/PTSD standing committee, which reports to the national Veterans Affairs & Rehabilitation Commission.
The TBI/PTSD Committee reviews methods, programs and strategies that can be used to treat traumatic brain injuries (TBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In order to reduce veteran suicide, this committee seeks to influence legislation and operational policies that can improve treatment and reduce suicide among veterans, regardless of their service eras.
This white paper report examines recent trends in veteran suicide and their potential causes and recommends steps to address this public health crisis.

Since 2001, the U.S. military has been actively engaged in combat operations on multiple continents in the Global War on Terror.More than 3 million Americans have served in Iraq or Afghanistan through the first 17 years of the war. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have become known as the “signature wounds” of the war, and in recent years, countless studies, articles and reports have documented an inordinately high suicide rate among those who have come home from the war, those of previous war eras and among active-duty personnel.

The American Legion is deeply concerned by the high suicide rate among service- members and veterans, which has increased substantially since 2001.1 The suicide rate among 18-24-year-old male Iraq and Afghanistan veterans is particularly troubling, having risen nearly fivefold to an all-time high of 124 per 100,000, 10 times the national average. A spike has also occurred in the suicide rate of 18-29-year-old female veterans, doubling from 5.7 per 100,000 to 11 per 100,000.2 These increases are startling when compared to rates of other demographics of veterans, whose suicide rates have stayed constant during the same time period.

Read the full report below:
[pdf-embedder url=”https://hadit.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/American-Legion-White-Paper-on-Veteran-Suicide-by-Jared-Keller.pdf” title=”American Legion White Paper on Veteran Suicide by Jared Keller”]

Have you tried going to the Vet Center ? I did and I’m glad.



I haven’t been to the Vet Center in a few years. My therapist there transferred and I moved to the civilian sector. The transition from one to the other was about as seamless as I could have hoped for thanks to my Vet Center therapist. She set me up for success with my new therapist and with myself. I had been in regular therapy since 1991 in California but in 1998 I moved to Missouri and a psych doc recommended I try the Vet Center.
The atmosphere and attitude was far removed from the hospital setting. I felt like even if they weren’t happy to see me they were polite enough to look like they were and I was cool with that.
It made a real difference for me, it might be worth it for you … If you are eligible (see below) and in need check for the closest Vet Center here.

Here’s a little history

The Vet Center Program was established by Congress in 1979 out of the recognition that a significant number of Vietnam era vets were still experiencing readjustment problems.  Vet Centers are community based and part of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.  In April 1991, in response to the Persian Gulf War, Congress extended the eligibility to veterans who served during other periods of armed hostilities after the Vietnam era.  Those other periods are identified as Lebanon, Grenada, Panama, the Persian Gulf, Somalia, and Kosovo/Bosnia.  In October 1996, Congress extended the eligibility to include WWII and Korean Combat Veterans. The goal of the Vet Center program is to provide a broad range of counseling, outreach, and referral services to eligible veterans in order to help them make a satisfying post-war readjustment to civilian life.  On April 1, 2003 the Secretary of Veterans Affairs extended eligibility for Vet Center services to veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and on June 25, 2003 Vet Center eligibility was extended to veterans of Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and subsequent operations within the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT).  The family members of all veterans listed above are eligible for Vet Center services as well. On August 5, 2003 VA Secretary Anthony J. Principi authorized Vet Centers to furnish bereavement counseling services to surviving parents, spouses,  children and siblings of service members who die of any cause while on active duty, to include federally activated Reserve and National Guard personnel.

Services

Readjustment counseling is a wide range of psycho social services offered to eligible Veterans, Service members, and their families in the effort to make a successful transition from military to civilian life.  They include:

  • Individual and group counseling for Veterans, Service members, and their families
  • Family counseling for military related issues
  • Bereavement counseling for families who experience an active duty death
  • Military sexual trauma counseling and referral
  • Outreach and education including PDHRA, community events, etc.
  • Substance abuse assessment and referral
  • Employment assessment & referral
  • VBA benefits explanation and referral
  • Screening & referral for medical issues including TBI, depression, etc.

Veterans Center Eligibility

Any Veterans and active duty Service members, to include members of the National Guard and Reserve components, who:

  • Have served on active military duty in any combat theater or area of hostility*

  • Experienced a military sexual trauma;

  • Provided direct emergent medical care or mortuary services, while serving on active military duty, to the casualties of war, or;

  • Served as a member of an unmanned aerial vehicle crew that provided direct support to operations in a combat zone or area of hostility.

  • Vietnam Era veterans who have accessed care at a Vet Center prior to January 1, 2004

    Vet Center services are also provided to family members of Veterans and Service members for military related issues when it is found aid in the readjustment of those that have served. This includes bereavement counseling for families who experience an active duty death.

Service in combat theater or area of hostility to include but not limited to:

  • World War II (including American Merchant Marines)
  • Korean War
  • Vietnam War
  • Lebanon
  • Grenada
  • Desert Storm/ Desert Shield
  • Bosnia
  • Kosovo
  • Operations in the former Yugoslavia area
  • Global War on Terrorism
  • Operation Enduring Freedom
  • Operation Freedom’s Sentinel
  • Operation Iraqi Freedom
  • Operation New Dawn

List By Symptom – VA Disability Compensation

In March 2020 the VA removed the DBQ’s from their website. NVLSP.org has made them available to the public here
See above, the links below currently are broken, since the VA removed the DBQ’s
Disability Benefits Questionnaire (DBQ) Veterans now have more control over the disability claims process. Veterans have the option of visiting a private health care provider instead of a VA facility to complete their disability evaluation form.
Veterans can have their providers fill out any of the more than 70 DBQs that are appropriate for their conditions and submit them to us. It’s that easy!
Source: www.benefits.va.gov
Current as of 09/05/207 Check here for the latest Disability Benefits Questionnaire (DBQ) 

Cardiovascular

Conditions – Symptoms Form Name
Evaluation of varicose veins, arterial diseases, producing swelling, claudication of legs, or pain on walking, skin/nail changes Artery and Vein Conditions (Vascular Diseases including varicose veins)
Evaluation of high blood pressure (BP): how to determine significance of BP readings or BP reading abnormalities. Hypertension
Conditions including: heart attack (MI), irregular rhythm, heart murmurs and heart surgery. Heart Conditions (Including IHD, Non-IHD, Arrhythmias Valvular Disease and Cardiac Surgery)

Dental and Oral

Conditions – Symptoms Form Name
Evaluation of all dental and oral conditions, except TMJ Conditions. Dental and Oral Conditions
Evaluation of conditions affecting the TMJ joint with pain in the jaw when biting and clicks and sounds in the jaw. Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) Conditions

Dermatological

Conditions – Symptoms Form Name
Evaluation for infectious and non-infectious diseases of the skin: how to evaluate rashes, spots, athlete’s foot, sweating, and acne skin lesions. Skin Diseases
Evaluation of palpable or disfiguring scars, producing distortion or asymmetry. Scars and Disfigurement

Ear, Nose, and Throat

Conditions – Symptoms Form Name
Evaluation of various conditions of the ear including: infections, dizziness, vertigo, acoustic tumors and other conditions with ringing in the ears (tinnitus). Ear Condition (including: Vestibular and Infectious Conditions)
Evaluation of Anosmia (inability to detect any odor), Hyposmia (reduced ability to detect odors), Ageusia (complete lack of taste), Hypogeusia (decrease in sense of taste) and other conditions affecting the sense of smell and taste. Loss of Sense of Smell and/or Taste
Evaluation of conditions affecting, the sinuses, nose, throat, larynx, and pharynx, including, but not limited to deviated nasal septum and organic aphonia, vocal chord problems. Sinusitis, Rhinitis, and other Conditions of the Nose, Throat, Larynx, and Pharynx

Endocrinological

Conditions – Symptoms Form Name
Evaluation of DM Type I or II, with alteration of blood sugar regulation, abnormal Glucose Tolerance Test (GTT), requiring medication or hospitalization or complications. Diabetes Mellitus (DM)
Evaluation of conditions affecting the hormone glands, including, but not limited to Cushing’s syndrome, Acromegaly, and Addison’s Disease. Endocrine Diseases (other than Thyroid and Parathyroid, or Diabetes Mellitus)
Evaluation of conditions affecting the functions regulated by the thyroid and parathyroid glands, including, but not limited to growth and metabolism. Thyroid and Parathyroid Conditions

Gastrointestinal

Conditions – Symptoms Form Name
Evaluation of conditions affecting the esophagus such as stricture, spasm, or other conditions with lump in throat or chest, pain on swallowing, or regurgitation. Esophageal Conditions (including GERD, Hiatal Hernia, and Other Esophageal Disorders)
Evaluation of gallbladder disease, with inflammation, gallstones, pain after eating fatty food, or pancreatic conditions including pancreatitis that manifests as severe recurrent abdominal pain. Gallbladder and Pancreas Conditions
Evaluation of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) (chronic recurrent diarrhea or constipation). Ulcerative colitis (chronic inflammatory bowel condition leading to erosions and bleeding) and other conditions with Bloody stools, fistulas, and/or abscess. Intestinal Conditions (other than surgical or infectious) including Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Crohn’s Disease, Ulcerative Colitis, and Diverticulits
Evaluation of hepatitis (which refers to a variety of inflammatory and infectious conditions) and Cirrhosis (chronic liver disease resulting from liver injury leading to degeneration of the liver)and other conditions characterized by jaundice, ascitis, fluid retention. Hepatitis, Cirrhosis and Other Liver Conditions
Evaluation of peritoneal adhesions, which are scars of the visceral lining of the abdominal structures that produces episodes of partial or complete bowel obstruction. Peritoneal Adhesions
Evaluation of stomach and duodenum conditions such as peptic ulcer disease, recurrent pain relieved by antacids, bloody stools, nausea or vomiting, indigestion. Stomach and Duodenum Conditions (not including GERD or Esophageal Disorders)
Evaluation of Amebiasis, dysentery, and various types of intestinal parasites with recurrent diarrhea, alteration in stool consistency or foul smell. Infectious Intestinal Disorders, including Bacterial and Parasitic Infections
Evaluation of removal of portions of the intestine and reconstruction and diversion of the intestinal tract: bowel diversion that requires use of external bags to collect stool. Intestinal Surgery (Bowel Resection, Colostomy, and Ileostomy)

Genitourinary

Conditions – Symptoms Form Name
Evaluation of renal diseases including Nephritis, renal insufficiency, and other diseases of the kidney: kidney failure, abnormal kidney function tests, protein in the urine, edema, kidney stones. Kidney Conditions (Nephrology)
Evaluation of diseases of the urethra, penis, testes, and scrotum, producing pain on urination, swelling, blood in urine or incontinence. Male Reproductive Organ Conditions
Evaluation of malignant lesions of the prostate gland with frequent diurnal or nocturnal urination. Prostate Cancer
Evaluation of conditions affecting the bladder and urethra, including, but not limited to voiding dysfunctions and infections. Urinary Tract (Bladder and Urethra)

Gynecological

Conditions – Symptoms Form Name
Evaluation of inflammatory neoplastic and cystic lesions of the breast: Breast mass or lumps. Breast Conditions and Disorders
Evaluation of diseases of the female genital tract including: uterus, vagina, cervix, ovaries, endometriosis, complications of pregnancy, and other conditions. Gynecological Conditions

Hematologic and Lymphatic

Conditions – Symptoms Form Name
Evaluation of conditions of red and white blood cells, producing anemias, leukemias on tumors such as lymphomas. Hematologic and Lymphatic Conditions

Infectious Diseases

Conditions – Symptoms Form Name
Evaluation of conditions associated with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and its treatment. HIV-Related Illnesses
Evaluation of infectious diseases not specifically-associated with either HIV or military service in a tropical area, the Persian Gulf, or Afghanistan. Infectious Diseases
Evaluation of infectious diseases associated with military service in tropical areas with exposure to salmonella, shigella, etc. producing symptoms such as chronic diarrhea. Persian Gulf and Afghanistan Infectious Diseases
Evaluation of conditions in which the immune system begins attacking healthy body tissues, including, but not limited to, Goodpasture’s syndrome and Guillain-Barre syndrome. Systemic Lupus Erthematosus (SLE) and Other Autoimmune Diseases
Evaluation of pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis symptoms. Tuberculosis (TB)
For use in evaluation of vitamin deficiencies (Beriberi, Pellagra, syndromes of dermatitis, diarrhea dementia in POW, post-GI surgery, bypass procedures, undernutrition and malabsorption.) Nutritional Deficiencies

Musculoskeletal

Conditions – Symptoms Form Name
Evaluation of extremity, limb or digit (complete or partial amputation), and complications. Evaluation of stumps. Amputations
Evaluation of ankle pain, persistent deformity (ankylosis), ankle injuries, reduction of movement, and use of assistive device. Ankle Conditions
Evaluation for non-degenerative arthritic conditions such as Gout and Rheumatoid Arthritis: recurrent painful and swollen joints. Non-degenerative Arthritis (including Inflammatory, Autoimmune, Crystalline, and Infectious Arthritis) and Dysbaric Osteonecrosis
Evaluation of injuries, deformities, loss of elbow and forearm producing motion limitation. Elbow and Forearm Conditions
Evaluation of reduction or loss of toe function and motion, and alteration in mobility. Foot conditions including flatfoot (pes planus)
Evaluation of alteration in motion of the wrists or digits due to tendon or muscle injuries, and alteration in motion and function of the hand including ankylosis, trigger finger, loss of finger movement. Hand and Finger Conditions
Evaluation of alteration in extension and flexion, poor postural and body support, and alteration of rotation of the hip. Hip and Thigh Conditions
Evaluation of ankylosis of the knee, subluxation of the knee, knee instability, meniscus lesions, and functional limitations knee cartilage problems, locked knee. Knee and Lower Leg Conditions
Evaluation of traumatic and other injuries resulting in loss or alteration of function, location, type, tears, and weakness: torn scarred muscles. Muscle Injuries
Evaluation of bone infections producing fever, local alteration of function, residuals from a bone infection with persistent drainage or bone alteration Osteomyelitis
Evaluation of arm limitation of function, dislocation, alteration in joint function, incomplete movements, deformity, dislocation, nonunion, and fracture complications : frozen shoulder. Shoulder and Arm Conditions
Evaluation of arthritis and neck deformities. Neck (Cervical Spine) Conditions
Evaluation of unfavorable or incomplete wrist motion due to ankylosis (limitation in range), painful or other alteration in function, resulting from traumatic or other injury complications, joint replacement. Wrist Conditions
Evaluation of chronic low back pain, arthritis and back injuries, spinal conditions or disc disease: low back pain with sciatica. Back (Thoracolumbar Spine) Conditions

Neurological

Conditions – Symptoms Form Name
Evaluation of progressive degenerative disease of the brain and spinal cord with progressive muscle weakness and wasting, speech, swallowing and breathing problems. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s Disease)
Evaluation of alteration of the function of the nerves (motor and sensory), related to Diabetes Mellitus: weakness, numbness, tingling of legs and arms related to diabetes. Diabetic Sensory-Motor Peripheral Neuropathy
Evaluation of numerous other neurologic conditions such as: meningitis, HIV, brain abscess, Lyme Disease, encephalitis, stroke, brain tumor, and spinal cord injury. Central Nervous System and Neuromuscular Diseases (except TBI, ALS, Parkinson’s Disease, MS, Headaches, TMJ, Epilepsy, Narcolepsy, Peripheral Nerves, Sleep Apnea, Cranial Nerves, Fibromyalgia, and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome)
Evaluation of conditions affecting the following nerves in the Cranium: V (trigeminal, VII (facial), IX (glossopharyngeal), X (vagus), XI (spinal accessory), and XII (hypoglossal). (Conditions affecting cranial nerves I (olfactory), II (optic), III (oculomotor), IV (trochlear), VI(abducens), and VIII (vestibulocochlear (auditory)) are addressed in other DBQs.) Cranial Nerve Conditions
Evaluation of recurrent episodes of head pain producing work limitation or incapacitation: with other symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, tearing etc. Headaches (including Migraine Headaches)
Evaluation of fibromyalgia components, including, but not limited to sleep problems, muscle and joint pain, and altered affect. Fibromyalgia
Evaluation of disorders of the myelin sheath of the central nervous systems producing recurrent alterations of neurological function: such as weakness, numbness, urine incontinence, visual symptoms. Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
Evaluation of symptoms that may include tremors, or trembling in hands, arms, legs, jaw, and face; rigidity, or stiffness of the limbs and trunk; bradykinesia, or slowness of movement; and postural instability, or impaired balance and coordination. Other symptoms may include depression and other emotional changes; difficulty in swallowing, chewing, and speaking; urinary problems or constipation; skin problems; and sleep disruptions. Parkinson’s Disease
Evaluation of narcolepsy components, including, but not limited to, sleep attacks, sleepiness, paralysis, and cataplexy. Narcolepsy
Evaluation of alteration of the function of Nerves associated with metabolic disorders, exposure to toxins, infections, immunological disorders, or inflammation and other conditions. Peripheral Nerve Conditions (not including Diabetes Sensory-Motor peripheral Neuropathy)
Evaluation of seizure conditions including epilepsy. Seizure Disorders

Ophthalmological

Conditions – Symptoms Form Name
Evaluation of various diseases of the eye, such as inflammation, infection, glaucoma, deformities, alteration of tear ducts, cataracts, retina disease, and other conditions. Eye Conditions

Psychological

Conditions – Symptoms Form Name
Evaluation for anorexia, bulimia, and other eating disorders. Eating Disorders
Evaluation of symptoms, history, and impact related to mental disorders: depression, mood and affective disorders, psychosis, etc. Mental Disorders (other than PTSD)
Evaluation of beginning and extent of symptoms (acute – length of symptoms is usually less than 3 months, chronic – symptoms usually last 3 months or more, with delayed onset – usually at least 6 months have passed between the traumatic experience and the beginning of symptoms). Symptoms may include: recurrent experiences of a traumatic event, avoiding an excitant or irritant associated with the trauma, deadening of general responsiveness, increased arousal, including insomnia, recurrent nightmares, and extreme caution; exhibiting an inflated frightened response; and experiencing changes in hostility.. Review Evaluation of PTSD

Respiratory

Conditions – Symptoms Form Name
Evaluation of the respiratory system except Sleep Apnea and Tuberculosis. Respiratory Conditions (other than TB and Sleep Apnea)
Evaluation of disorder characterized by cessation of breathing during sleep and provides information necessary to determine functional impact (sleep apnea, snoring) daytime complications. Sleep Apnea

Rheumatological Diseases

Conditions – Symptoms Form Name
Evaluation of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Components including but not limited to tiredness, loss of memory or concentration and enlarged lymph nodes. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

General Surgical

Conditions – Symptoms Form Name
Evaluation of conditions involving internal organs bulging through the muscle, except hiatal hernia. Hernias (including Abdominal, Inguinal, and Femoral Hernias)
Evaluation of rectum and anus conditions causing alteration of sphincter control, stricture of prolapse, fistula, and other symptoms. Bowel incontinence or severe constipation blood in stools. Rectum and Anus Conditions (including Hemorrhoids)

Further Reading:

ptsd Please review my C&P Sleep Apnea DBQ – Veterans …

https://community.hadit.com › … › Veterans Compensation & Pension Exams

 

Mar 27, 2017 – Posted March 27, 2017. Hello guys, please let me know what you think about my Sleep Apnea DBQ, hopefully this is enough to get my service connected? 30% or 50%?. Sleep Apnea Disability Benefits Questionnaire. Is this DBQ being completed in conjunction with a VA 21-2507, C&P Examination. Request? [X] Yes [ ] No.

How Long Does A Gulf War Illness C&p Exam Take? – Veterans …

https://community.hadit.com › … › Veterans Compensation & Pension Exams

 

3 days ago – Depends on what you are claiming. If you are claiming a multitude injuries/ symptoms/benefits then it could take that long. What will happen in the exam: The doctor/nurse/pa, etc. will have your claimed disabilities and will exam/question you for for each one according to the DBQ(Disability Questionnaire) for the particular …

DBQ Chronic Adjustment disorder – Veterans Compensation Benefits …

https://community.hadit.com › … › Veterans Compensation & Pension Exams

 

Jun 1, 2017 – Well not to sure how this will pan out any ideas? Will they finally seperate my PTSD/ AD from my TBI maybe maybe not ones getting a call to the complaint line if not? I was just found Permanent and total two days ago with this claim still pending I’m still awaiting the award letter. I’m hoping this won’t hurt my PT due that I …

Michigander – Veterans Compensation Benefits Claims – Hadit.com

https://community.hadit.com/profile/24501-michigander/

 

Nov 19, 2017 – $400 that she recommended she knew and for me to go to and have a DBQ filled out to file my claim. I chose to ignore that advice and began reading up and asking questions on the Hadit site. With the help on Hadit and on the podcast I was able to educate myself and file my claim even as a FDC (Fully Developed Claim).

Is it me or is my claim moving really fast? – Veterans Compensation …

https://community.hadit.com › … › Veterans Compensation Benefits Claims Research

 

3 days ago – Posted June 22, 2016. I filed a claim for bilateral lower extremity radiculopathy secondary to lower back and the doctor said it was caused by a foot fracture :). The DBQ is on MyHealthVet. I just checked ebenefits and the status has changed to Pending Decision Approval with an estimated completion date 6/28/16 to 7/2/ 16.

Leaderboard – Veterans Compensation Benefits Claims

https://community.hadit.com/leaderboard/

 

Dec 31, 2017 – I submitted PTSD DBQ along with other evidence as a FDC claim. Thanks so much, and I really appreciate all the support from Hadit. Been a long couple of years, but I am so grateful for you guys, and the fact the Military and Govt is admitting what they put me thru. Hope you all have a Happy New Year, and God Bless!!!

MST Claim – I have started the journey – Veterans Compensation …

https://community.hadit.com › Specialized Claims › MST – Military Sexual Trauma

 

May 5, 2017 – My exam is tomorrow… and I just looked at the letter for the C&P and the exam time allows for 2 hours and it has a section for the examiner of “Special clinic instructions”. Services Requested: DBQ PSYCH PTSD initial (1), DBQ Medical Opinion-BH: PSYCH PTSD initial (1), DBQMedical Opinion – BH: PSYCH PTSD Initial 2 …

C&P Exams for Back, Hips and Knees, could someone review and …

https://community.hadit.com › … › Veterans Compensation & Pension Exams

 

Jun 11, 2017 – Back (Thoracolumbar Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire. Name of patient/Veteran: Is this DBQ being completed in conjunction with a VA 21-2507 , C&P Examination Request? [X] Yes [ ] No. ACE and Evidence Review ————- ———- Indicate method used to obtain medical information to complete this …

LHI C&P exams never received by VA (they say) – Veterans …

https://community.hadit.com › … › Veterans Compensation Benefits Claims Research

 

3 days ago – Hello all. Any idea how to get LHI (contractor) C&P exam results? The VA over the phone says they never received the DBQ’s which have now pasted the due date. Called both places I had the exams at and left a voicemail. The day of exams both places said they would be sent in within 24 hours of exam so I guess they …

Secondary Conditions: How to file? – Veterans Compensation Benefits …

https://community.hadit.com › … › Veterans Compensation Benefits Claims Research

 

1 day ago – The veteran can go ahead and get the medical opinion/DBQ for each proposed secondary condition, with adequate medical rationale and appropriate jargon (” as likely as not”, “more likely than not”, or “due to/caused by”). Once all 3 requirements are met, they could go ahead and file a fully developed claim. If the medical …

Actions Needed to Ensure Post- Traumatic Stress Disorder and Traumatic Brain Injury Are Considered in Misconduct Separations – GAO Report May 2017 » HadIt.com VA Disability Claims Veteran to Veteran

GAO is making five recommendations, including that DOD direct the Air Force and Navy to address inconsistencies in their screening and training policies and ensure that the military services monitor adherence to their screening, training, and counseling policies. DOD agreed with four of GAO’s recommendations, but did not agree to address inconsistencies in training policies. GAO maintains inconsistencies should be addressed, as discussed in the report.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.hadit.com

Patrick Jones – Living with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) with help from Evernote – Evernote Blog

Name: Patrick Jones Location: Colorado, USA Website: Brain Injury Chaplain Uses: Evernote for Mac and Evernote for iPhone We hear many interesting and unique stories from our users who tell us how Evernote helps them remember everything, but we never realized how important that could be until we got a note from Deacon Patrick Jones …

Sourced through Scoop.it from: blog.evernote.com

Navy SEAL brain study examines blast injuries | UTSanDiego.com

A study well worth doing and following for veterans of all era’s. As I read more about TBI I see that some of the symptoms that were once attributed to PTSD may also be symptoms of TBI. This is why it is so important to let the VA know if you suffered any kind of significant impact to your noggin including blasts. Did you know you don’t have to unconscious to have a concussion? I found that out a couple of years ago.
Navy SEAL brain study examines blast injuries | UTSanDiego.com By Jeanette Steele 4:50 P.M. DEC. 10, 2014
Excerpt
A pilot study in San Diego will look at how Navy SEAL brains are affected by repeated blasts, research with possible implications for other Americans who suffer brain injuries.

Two U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs researchers will use $30,000 in privately raised funds for what’s being called the “SEAL Breacher Study,” referring to the military term for using explosives to blow open a door.”